IoT–Exploring the next big thing in mobile May 1, 2016

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,5G,Chetan Sharma Consulting,Mobile Breakfast Series,The Golden Age of Mobile,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

Internet of Things (IoT) has been hailed as the next big thing in the mobile industry. As connections from objects and things interconnect with existing and new end points, the networked effect can provide tremendous opportunities, reshape existing processes, user experiences, and expectations. But, really, how real is IoT and what will it take to reach the billions of dollars promised. Will it fundamentally alter how we do things? We are starting to see signs of tremendous progress. GE is investing $4B+ into its version of IoT – the industrial Internet and it is making the difference in operations and machine learning. Connected consumer gadgets are enabling us to lead healthier lives, work more efficiently, and manage our time more effectively.

Chetan Sharma Consulting hosted the first Mobile Breakfast Series event of the year in Vancouver and we delved deeply into the subject of IoT and what it means. We talked about the opportunities it represents, the challenges it faces, and the timeline for success. The panel took a look at the fundamental elements of IoT that will be a key layer for the Connected Intelligence Era.

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Shahid Ahmed is a Partner at PwC where he leads the Emerging Technology and IoT Practice. Previously, Shahid was the Managing Director with Accenture, where he had P&L responsibility for North America’s Communications business.  In this role, Shahid helped telecommunications clients build new capabilities, operate more efficiently and drive new growth.  He was also responsible for the Network practice in North America.  During his twenty-year tenure at Accenture, Shahid was involved in creating many practices including the formation of the Wireless Practice and helping to start the Accenture Cisco Business Group. Prior to joining Accenture, Shahid held several management positions at Sprint where he rolled out and expanded Sprint’s cellular services in North America.   Shahid was also responsible for rolling out the first cellular digital packet data (CDPD) capability in the US. Shahid is an active member of several wireless industry groups. He currently serves on multiple Advisory Boards such as the Smart Network Council, Cellular Telecommunication and Internet Association (CTIA), Northwestern University Masters in Engineering Management (MEM) Program and The Coral Group. In February 2011, Shahid was appointed as an Advisor to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Technical Advisory Council advising on technology issues facing the United States.  Shahid was chair of the M2M/IoT working group and currently chairs the cyber-security working group.

Rob Tiffany is the Global Technology Lead for the Internet of Things at Microsoft where he’s shipped smartphones and architected + developed many of the world’s largest enterprise mobile, IoT and wireless solutions. Prior to Microsoft, he spent his career as an entrepreneur, executive, strategist and writer of bestselling books on mobile and wireless technologies. A pioneer of the mobile revolution, he drove the development of the mobile app ecosystem and co-founded the world’s first cloud-based, mobile device management company. He started his career in the M2M business in the early days of wireless, bringing unintelligent vending machines to life.

Gonzalo Tudela is CEO and Co-founder of Vandrico Solutions, an enterprise wearables software company based in Vancouver Canada. With a background in Finance and Mining Operations, Gonzalo is an early champion of the positive impact wearable technology will have on large commercial operations. His insights have been featured in publications such as The Globe and Mail, Entrepreneur Magazine and TechCrunch. Gonzalo is a TEDx speaker who regularly presents to business leaders across the world. His expertise has been televised internationally to millions of viewers on the Globo TV network and on CBC. Gonzalo currently leads Vandrico in helping large global organizations use wearable technology as a way to overcome safety and operational challenges.

Rob Chandhok currently serves as President and COO of Helium, which provides a complete Internet of Things platform that makes sense of your things. Prior to Helium, Chandhok served as president of Qualcomm Interactive Platforms and senior vice president of Qualcomm Technologies Inc., where he was responsible for Qualcomm products and strategies that enabled people to benefit from the Internet of Everything, including wearable computing, vision-based computing via the Vuforia augmented reality platform, and the AllJoyn software development framework, an open source project of the AllSeen Alliance. Chandhok has years of practical and product-oriented experience in wireless communications and the Internet. He takes a systems-level approach to innovative communication oriented products, from chips up to applications and user interface. Chandhok holds 36 patents and has 23 published articles.

The highlights of the discussion were:

· Shahid was just back from the big Hannover fair in Germany. He gave a good overview of the emerging movement towards of what is being called Industrial 4.0 essentially a derivative of Connected Intelligence. Industrial nations like Germany and Japan are very worried about staying relevant in the new economy. It’s worth reading the official summary here. US was the showcase country this year so there were plenty of representation from US tech giants like GE, Intel, Microsoft, AT&T, and many others. Even President Obama took time to represent the US interests at the show. The bottom line of the show was that everything is getting connected, really fast, and the change is coming faster than we can think. There were several case studies that highlight this as we will discuss below.

· Rob Chandhok has cut his teeth in the mobile ecosystem with years of experience building technology and ecosystems at Qualcomm and is now shepherding Helium to become a contender in the IoT space. Fresh from raising a $20M round with GV and the likes, Helium is making good progress in that dimension. As he stated on the panel, Helium wants to become Android of the IoT world.

· Rob Tiffany started his career in the M2M space building vending machines that could communicate and help with the operations but as he leaned all too painfully, it is not about the technology but also about the human element that we need to be always cognizant of it.

· Gonzalo’s background is in mining and he is connecting the mining world to IoT and vice-versa and is in the process building out a platform that can be applied to many other use cases but the focus is on how to make things better, safer, workers more productive, operators cheaper and effective, and the ROI a no-brainer.

· While the news headlines are captured by the likes of consumer gadgets and gizmos, almost all of the revenue and profits is in Industrial or Enterprise IoT and that’s where we focused all of our attention.

· At the highest level, the main goals of IoT are one or more of the following: to reduce cost and expense, reduce risk, increase productivity, enhance consumer engagement which results into higher revenue and better profitability, and obviously at the end of the day – increase revenues with new revenue streams or new business models applied to the old businesses or just doing a better job with the existing streams.

· Product companies are turning into services companies. IoT is also enabling new business models. The prominent examples are: Rolls Royce and GE are leasing their jet-engines by the hour rather than selling them so that they can very accurately predict the maintenance windows and maximize usage by reducing downtime costs. It has led to increase in revenue and best margins for the business.

· Many folks in the industry view IoT as dumb endpoints to collect data but clearly there much more to it. Even sending control commands to manipulate the outcomes are a big step forward. However, the clear benefits come when the end-points are smart and are capable of making decisions. In the case of Helium sensors, software can be updated over time. In fact, if the sensor is not software upgradable, you shouldn’t even consider buying the sensor. As such, some of the new low-power networks like Sigfox and Lora are a non-starter in the long-run because they just don’t have the bandwidth to send updates to the end-points efficiently. I think the role of these two networks is similar to that of WiMax. It helped accelerate the LTE evolution. Similarly, SIgfox and Lora spurred the growth of NB-IoT and the ecosystem around it is being built quickly.

· Another great example is from RioTinto – they have dozens of mining operations around the world and operate heavy equipment. With the help of sensors, they are able to operate autonomous vehicles. In fact, RioTinto is the world’s largest owner and operator of autonomous haulage system trucks. By operating autonomously, more material can be moved safely and better yield is delivered.

· In the underground mining operations, Vandrico equips miners with off-the-shelf wearables and the data from the sensors is used to provide specific instructions based on the type of work, location within the mine, and other contextual factors that need to be considered in real-time operators.

· This leads to how the business model should be designed. More and more folks are thinking about value-based pricing. The communication piece in IoT is practically a commodity and so the value is in the outcomes. Gonzalo brainstormed some interesting value propositions that he is thinking about for e.g. pricing based on lives saved or extra production of the mineral (in case gold, copper and other valuable minerals, one can hit the jackpot).

· Microsoft has a number of good framework elements that can be used for IoT like Azure cloud, Analytics, BI, real-time event processing of high volume, etc. With Amazon, Microsoft are the two giants in the IoT cloud space.

· The IoT stack is very fragmented and it will continue to be such for a time before some consolidation takes place.

· Opex of IoT devices/network is generally bigger than the capex.

· Security is of course a big deal in IoT. Some think about it all the time but in general there is a big gap in the industry. Regulators are slow to move as well. Perhaps a big public fiasco will force the industry and the regulators to come up with guidelines and rules that can be enforced. Just because you can encrypt data doesn’t mean you are securing the data from the sensor. The fact that it is emitting data (garage opener) can be captured by nefarious elements. Encrypted data is of no use in such scenarios. So, as an industry, we need to take a much deeper look into how we deal with security and privacy of IoT data and end-points.

· BP provided fitbits to their employees and saw a 44% reduction in sick-days. That’s enormous amount of hours that can change how the business is run. It will also have a ripple effect on the fabric of society – insurance, health care facilities, education, social security, etc. will all be impacted.

· Gaming might provide some interesting business model lessons for IoT.

· In the end, Industrial IoT is about managing business outcomes to impact the basic operating metrics of the company and the ecosystem.

· The threat of cybersecurity looms large and we just don’t have the integration, collective framework to even start tackling the problem. Lots of challenges and opportunities to tackle this.

· There are big differences in expectations of IoT solutions in the developed vs. emerging worlds. Pricing is the biggest variable. As such companies operating in the space had to adjust their pricing models to suit the market and make it more palatable to the markets such as India and China.

· It was kind of reflective of the state of the industry that we didn’t talk much about the mobile operators who dominated the industry until 2010-11 and are slowly becoming less relevant in the 4th wave era (more to come on this). Of course, there are a few operators like AT&T, Verizon, Vodafone, Telefonica, and DT who are quite active in the space not only at the connectivity layer but actually on all layers of the stack. However, their best opportunity might be managing the OSS stack for the Industrial world.

Overall, it was an excellent panel with diverse viewpoints covering a technology evolution that is just getting started. It is exciting to be part of this shift and help shape the conversation which is bound to have a fundamental impact on the global economy. My thanks to our sponsor Optimus Information for their support, all the speakers who traveled great distances to be with us, and to the attendees who took out their morning to be with us. Everyone was glued to the discussion and the time flew by very fast. And we barely were able to scratch the surface. We will continue the dialog in the coming days, months, and years.

Our next opportunity is our Mobile Breakfast Series in Seattle on June 7th where we will add 5G to the mix and explore where are the opportunities at the intersection of 5G and IoT. We will look into what the new world of 5G will look like and how it will impact IoT.

As always, we welcome your input which helps in planning future forums and brainstorm sessions.

Thanks

Chetan Sharma

US Mobile Market Update – 2015 March 9, 2016

Posted by chetan in : 4G,4th Wave,5G,AORTA,Applications,ARPU,Chetan Sharma Consulting,Connected Intelligence Era,IoE,IoT,Mobile 2016,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Ecosystem,Mobile Future Forward,Smart Cities,Smart Phones,The Golden Age of Mobile,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

US Mobile Market Update – 2015

http://www.chetansharma.com/usmarketupdate2015.htm

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Highlights of the US Mobile Market 2015

· The overall mobile market expanded by 18% increase in revenues.

· Mobile data revenues increased by 17% YoY and now contribute 72% of the overall service revenues. In terms of data contribution, US is catching up with Japan which has been a leader in data % since the iMode days.

· For the first time in its history of the US market, the service revenues declined.

· For 2015, the voice revenues declined by 24%, messaging revenues declined by 18%, tablets saw the dip by 18%, handsets saw an increase of 5%, access revenues by 23% and 4th wave services dominated with an increase of 60%.

· The Capex contracted for a second year in a row.

· Device revenues are now 21% of the overall.

· EBITDA and Net Income saw double digit gains indicating operators are running a much tighter ship than before.

· Churn is at historic lows. Despite all the commotion in the market, 7% fewer customers churned in 2015.

· After falling sharply in 2014, the data prices remained pretty stable throughout the year.

· Mobile data traffic grew again with per sub smartphone consumption at 3.9 GB/user/mo (see note below on data traffic)

· In the first 10 weeks of Binge-on, T-Mobile users chomped away 34 PB of data for free or what was the entire year’s worth of data traffic on T-Mobile’s network in 2010. T-Mobile experienced a net traffic reduction of 10-15% but given that consumers are consuming 3x than before, overall traffic will rise again.

· AT&T added 4 million cars to their network. While postpaid business has its challenges, the connected devices business showed significant strength in 2015.

· Verizon’s IoT/Telematics accounted for $690M in 2015 and is likely to cross the $1B mark in 2016 making US the hotbed for Connected Intelligence activities, growth, and continued experimentation.

· Apple again dominated the device market with over 45% revenue share, 81% profits share with only 16%-unit share.

· Android ecosystem revenues grew by 5% but the profits declined by 2%

· There were more tablets added to the network than phones in 2015. Cars outperformed M2M by a good margin.

· T-Mobile edged past Verizon in postpaid netadds, AT&T was ahead in Prepaid, Verizon in Connected devices, Sprint in wholesale, and Verizon overall had the most netadds in 2015.

· AT&T and Verizon on average made $16 per sub/mo, T-Mobile turned into positive territory with $1 profit/sub/mo while Sprint stayed in negative territory with a loss of $0.55 per sub/mo.

· The valuation of Uber surpassed the combined market cap of T-Mobile and Sprint.

What to expect in 2016? Questions for 2016.

· We expect the overall US mobile market to pass the half a trillion-dollar mark in 2016.

· US will cross 400M in subscriptions in 2016.

· After the pause of dropping data prices in 2015, we could see intense price wars in 2016.

· The upcoming auction could be the big story of the year.

· What new 5G test results will be announced and will industry converge on some 5G standards ahead of the 2019 deadline?

· Will Comcast MVNO follow Google-Fi as a niche endeavor or does it have elements to fundamentally impact the market. 2016 will hopefully answer the question about the future of WiFi-first network strategy.

· Will the upcoming eSim integration in devices go far enough to disrupt the market?

· Will IoT gain sufficient steam to justify the forecasts?

· Can Android OEMs turn around the decline in profits in 2016?

· Can iPhone7 boost Apple’s growth numbers in 2016?

· Will the service revenue decline in the US reverse itself or are we seeing the start of the decline in revenues in the industry?

· Autonomous driving was a big story last year; what progress are we going to make in 2016? How will Uber shape the autonomous driving business models?

· AT&T and Verizon have bet big on video. How will the respective strategies pan out in 2016?

· The Apple-FBI is going to be one of the most watched cases in the world. Whichever way the final ruling lands has huge implications for the tech industry and consumers.

We will be doing an in-depth analysis of the future of the mobile industry at our 7th annual mobile executive summit Mobile Future Forward in Sept 2016. Hope you can join us.

Service Revenue Decline, what does 2016 hold in store?

The overall service revenue, postpaid revenue, overall and postpaid ARPU all declined. In general, the net-service revenue decline is not a good sign if it is market induced. In Europe, we saw net-revenue declines but the impact of the economic crisis was a big factor in determining the trajectory. After the economy has improved, we have seen the net revenue in effected countries rise again. In the US, the net-revenue decline is more market induced. The calculation of service revenue is a bit more complicated because device revenues are no longer part of the mix and as customers are weaning off the contracts, we have to adjust the service revenue for this accounting change. If we take the accounting distortion into account, service revenue is still in the positive growth territory but in terms of how operators report service revenues, this was the first year the category saw a decline. Regardless of the accounting distortions, there is continuous pressure on the postpaid revenues which is what is impacting the overall numbers.

Given the competitive state of the market, we might see further service revenue declines in 2016. The reversal might come down to consolidation in the industry in 2017 and beyond. The pressure on the revenues has had a positive impact though – operators are running far tighter ships than before. The net income surged in 2016.

The licensed vs. unlicensed: frenemies

Comcast is expected to launch its WiFi first MVNO with Verizon fairly this year. Google Fi hasn’t been a roaring success, perhaps it was never designed to be. Given that WiFi is carrying 75-80% of the traffic, it is easy to make the business case for a national WiFi operator. Companies like Republic Wireless have shown that this can be done. Keeping aside some of the technical challenges with WiFi, there are two major business challenges with the WiFi strategy. First, even with the rise of WiFi usage, the cellular usage hasn’t slowed down. Cellular data usage is still growing 60-70% YoY. As such, consumers will have to rely on cellular when they are out and about which means the economics comes down to the wholesale rate the MVNO has for cellular. The second big problem is the lack of handset choices. For consumers, handset choice is paramount. They want both iOS and Android devices to go with their data plans. WiFi operators generally have limited handsets. Over time this will change but to have a WiFi network of scale, economics, choice, and pricing are critical. By contract, cellular operators will always have a leg-up on the MVNOs unless access regulations are in place which of course are nowhere in sight.

Seeing the success of WiFi, FCC has rightly made more unlicensed spectrum available and it will be interesting to see how the ecosystem around 3.5GHz and other bands develop. This in light of what’s happening in the higher bands of cm and mmwave for 5G deployments. Technologies and business models that take into account benefits and drawbacks of both types of spectrum bands across a different uses cases will win out in the end. Despite advances, WiFi calling still has quality issues so the need for traditional networks is not going away anytime soon.

M&A 2016

As we mentioned last year, the service provider M&A window for 2016 pretty much closed late 2015 given the upcoming auctions and the presidential cycle.  There might still be some cross border opportunities but for any major transactions, it is better to wait it out to have a reasonable chance of success.

IoT Revenue Streams and what it means for the ecosystem

Service provider IoT revenue passed the important $1B mark back in 2013. So far it is tracking the growth of the early days of mobile data. However, they are different curves influenced by different factors. Mobile data was relatively an easier curve to climb as the revenues went up as more data handsets came online. The sales, business case, and ROI was straight forward. IoT is a bit more complicated as it across multiple vertical areas and it is not just about the data network, it is about the complete solution. The sales cycle and execution strategy is different and requires patience and resilience.

AT&T already had an active IoT developer program. Verizon introduced its ThingSpace platform to the developers last year. It is already selling complete IoT solutions in energy, transportation, security, and several other industry segments. As we mentioned before, Verizon is on track to crack the billion-dollar mark in IoT this year. For trivia buffs, Verizon passed the billion-dollar mark in mobile data revenues back in 2004 which at the time made only 5%of the overall wireless revenues for the operator.

We will be doing an in-depth analysis of the IoT Opportunity at our upcoming Mobile Breakfast Series in April and May.

Mobile data growth – Correcting the Cisco Numbers

Mobile data consumption (cellular) continues to grow as devices and networks continue to improve. There are 13 countries now with at least 1GB/mo/sub consumption. US is amongst the top three. At the end of 2015, the average consumption per sub in the US was at 3.9 GB/mo/sub.

Earlier this quarter, Cisco released its annual VNI report that forecasts data consumption and growth around the world. However, they did something very unusual this time, they pulled back their “factual numbers” by 36% for the US market. Based on our research which is corroborated by the data from the sources, Cisco’s numbers are low. Given that a lot of policy papers use these numbers as an input, we thought it will be worthwhile providing the reasonable estimates for data growth in the US market. These estimates match well with the data growth numbers in the Ericsson report.

Our estimates are that the US data consumption last year was close to 10.9 Exabytes. Ericsson reported approximately 10.5 Exabytes. Cisco adjusted its numbers from 9.2 Exabytes to 6 Exabytes.

Android vs. iOS: The fight for profit continues

Amongst the prominent Android OEMs, HTC, Sony, LG, and Lenovo all lost money in their device business in 2015. This again highlights the difficulty in differentiating on an open platform. Some of these players might give up on their handset business in 2016. Apple again dominated with 81% of the profit share, 45% of the revenue share, with only 16% of the unit share. Samsung’s profitability improved a bit but it continues to face challenges both on the top and bottom end of the spectrum.

4th Wave Revenues

5 years ago, we put forth the theory of 4th wave to explain the upcoming changes in the mobile ecosystem. For the most part, the industry changes and tribulations have tracked the 4th wave curves. Last year, voice revenues fell down by 23%, messaging revenues declined by 18%, while data revenues grew by 23%. 4th wave revenues which now dominate the ecosystem now grew by a 60% YoY. We will have more analysis of the state of the 4th wave ecosystem later in the year.

In its Q4 15 earnings call, Verizon laid out its 3-Tier strategy which is similar to the 4th wave digital strategy we have been working on with many operators around the globe since 2011 (see paper and slides for details). Without moving up the stack, eventually, operators will run out of the data steam that is powering their revenues today.

Regulations for the new age

Some of the regulations in the communications space are over a 100-year-old. Communications itself has drastically changed though the principle of transferring the bits from point A to B remains the same. T-Mobile reported that 50% of its voice calls are are on VoLTE. IP messaging is many times the SMS global volume. Gradually, almost all voice and messaging will be on the IP layer – voice and messaging will just become apps on the data layer. So pretending and regulating these services as if it were 2000 doesn’t help. An ideal strategy for consideration should be that the IP layer gets regulated for fair pricing, competition, and consumer good while everything on the top of the IP layer gets regulated on a “same service, same rules” principle. The interconnection between apps to deliver services like connection to PSTN, E911, etc. can be addressed by fair market pricing principles. VR is going to become the next communication platform; IP messaging the next application development and commerce platform. To keep the regulatory regime simple and in with the times, by focusing on the access layer, one can guarantee that whatever takes place on the top has the opportunity to grow as the market desires. Similarly, data rules across all apps and services on top of the IP layer should be the same irrespective of the provider. This market shift is required to make the market more competitive and fair.

Connected Devices – Resetting the target

The 50B number by 2020 has gotten into the industry lexicon since 2010 when Ericsson first suggested that we are likely to reach this target by the end of the decade. Others picked up the number and either copied it or even went further by suggesting even 75B+ numbers. By the middle of this decade, it looks unlikely, we will hit 50B. Our research shows that we were at approximately 16B last year. It is tall order to make up 34B in 5 years. Given the new evidence and assumptions, Ericsson also revised its estimates down to 28B by 2021 (the 2020 number is just over 25B). 25B+ is still an excellent target and something the industry can be proud of. The 50B number still gets thrown around a lot by vendors and media. We will be better off as an industry if we adjust the forecasts based on ground realities and not unnecessarily hype things.

Apple – what’s next? Mastering the narrative

Apple’s profit in Q4 were the highest recorded in the history of mankind. Let that sink in for a minute. Its $18B in profit on $76B revenue was truly astonishing. Yet, the markets were disappointed. What gives? First, the markets care about growth more than they care about the size of the profits or revenue. If the growth number matches or exceeds the expectations, the stock price responds positively otherwise it moves in the other direction. Second, for the first time since 2003, Apple issued a negative guidance on sales.

The unwritten narrative for Apple’s success has been around the iPhone juggernaut. Now that the high-end market for smartphones is starting to saturate, Apple needs a new narrative that can tie to growth. Apple took a shot at it by releasing some new details around services revenue. In any other company, this would have been received very well. With Apple, expectations of the market are supersized so it is not clear if the pivot towards services will help reshape the basic narrative around Apple’s growth.

Connected Consumer

· On average, each US household spent approximately $3800 on access and devices in 2015.

· Roughly 80% or $3000 of the US household spend went to access of services such as cellular voice, mobile data, cable, landline voice, and broadband internet.

· Roughly 20% or $800 of the US household spend went to devices such as computers, smartphones, feature phones, wearables, tablets, e-readers, connected cars, drones, robots, connected home, and other connected devices.

· 41% of the household access spend went to cellular phones (for voice and data services).

· As a standalone category, mobile data is the biggest category approaching $1000 in yearly household spend.

· In the last 5 years, mobile data spend has risen the most and landline voice has declined the most. Cellular voice spend has also gone down while cable and broadband spend have seen relatively modest uptick.

· In devices, smartphone is by far the biggest spend category. Consumers spend almost 3x on smartphones than they spend on personal computers. Smartphones accounted for more than 50% of the US household connected spend in 2015.

· New categories such as wearables, connected cars, drones/robotics, and connected homes have started to make a tangible impact on consumer spend.

· US consumers spent more on wearables than feature phones in 2015.

· Chetan Sharma Consulting conducted its annual Connected Consumer survey of 1000 US households. The results confirmed the ongoing increase in the number of connected devices/household.

Quad Moves

AT&T is integrating its DirectTV acquisition. Verizon acquired AOL and launched Go90. Similar moves are afoot in Europe and other regions. Regular readers won’t be surprised. Video is a key offering for many service providers and by bundling quad plays, operators can further lower the churn. Content will continue to play a big role in how various offerings get bundled. The traditional cable bundle is being pulled apart in favor of more al carte OTT offerings. Media companies will have to figure out how they play in the new converged world. The ones that have been sitting on the sidelines will have to make some moves in the wireless ecosystem to stay relevant in the long-term.

The Upcoming 5G wars?

5G is gaining steam. All the major players have outline their preliminary plans to do trials on 5G (code word for we don’t want to be perceived as being behind). However, there is some real progress being made in short-range ecosystem of 5G. As I noted, in my MWC note, some of the demos coming out of the labs are exciting. In the US, Verizon’s announcement last year took folks by surprise. By Q1 16, both AT&T and T-Mobile announcement their version of 5G trials. Verizon was out with the first batch of results from its experiments indicating 10Gbps throughput at short-distances. Given the momentum behind cm/mm wave, it is possible that some consensus is built around the spectrum bands by country (and not wait till WRC 19) to get the device ecosystem going.

A lot is still unknown about 5G, specifically, what will be the economics of 5G and the business case for new capex and ROI. We hope to explore this topic in more detail in the coming months.

Our paper on 5G covers the past, present, and future of the network evolution.

What to expect in the coming months?

2015 was a tremendous year for mobile industry thus far as it becomes omnipresence in every industry. We saw some massive moves, astounding acquisitions, and interesting strategic endeavors. The final quarter which is typically the biggest in terms of revenue will lay the foundation for an exciting 2016.

As usual, we will be keeping a very close eye on the micro- and macro-trends and reporting on the market on a regular basis in various private and public settings.

Against this backdrop, the analysis of the Q4 2015 and 2015 US wireless market is:

Service Revenues

· The US mobile data services revenues in Q4 2015 increased 3% QoQ and 16% YoY.

· After crossing the $100B in data revenues for two straight years, the US market is set for another excellent mobile data services year though some slowdown has started to occur as predicted by our 4th wave thesis.

· Verizon and AT&T dominated the quarter accounting for 69% of the mobile data services revenue and had 67% of the subscription base.

· Verizon and AT&T are at #2 & #3 global mobile data revenue ranking respectively in Q4 2015. Sprint and T-Mobile also maintained their rankings in the top 10 global mobile data operators.

ARPU

· The Overall ARPU fell by 2.2%. 

· Data contribution to the overall revenues is now at 72%.

· After a minor blip of positive growth in postpaid ARPU by T-Mobile and AT&T earlier this year, all operators saw declines in postpaid ARPU in Q4 with Sprint showing the sharpest decline with 18% change YoY.

Subscribers

· The US market increased its net-adds to 6.7M. AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile all added approx. 2M or more subs. Sprint also showed positive net-adds though at a fraction of the top 3.

· Verizon again led in postpaid net-adds though a bulk of the net-adds are coming from tablets.

· AT&T has approximately 7M connected cars on their network – probably the highest of any mobile operator in the world.

4th Wave Progress

· The number of players making $250M/quarter on mobile continues to increase rapidly and these aren’t your traditional wireless players. For example, Mobile is now contributing 80% (up from 30% in Q1 2013) to Facebook’s quarterly revenues. Even traditional players like Hertz, Sears, and Starbucks are generating meaningful revenues from mobile. There are now dozens of such players and the list is just growing. (for more discussion on the topic please see: “Mobile 4th Wave: Evolution of the Next Trillion Dollars”)

· The cloud and security segments have also gained significant traction with incumbents as well as startups launching new initiatives and technologies.

· Verizon reported $200 million revenue from M2M and Telematics. At the current run-rate, this will be a billion dollar business by 2016. The current annualized run rate is $800M.

Connected Devices

· Connected devices (non-phones) accounted for almost 66% of the net-adds in Q4 2015. This means that while there is a healthy smartphone sales pipeline, it is for the existing subs and as such net-adds for the phone business is tapering off and we can expect that new net-adds will continue to be dominated by the connected devices segment.

Handsets 

· Smartphones continued to be sold at a brisk pace accounting almost 97% of the devices sold in Q4 2015. The feature phone category is practically becoming extinct in the US market.

· The smartphone penetration in the US is now at 83%.

· Verizon continues to sell more LTE smartphones as its LTE sub tally rose to 84M making it the #2 LTE operator behind China Mobile which has more than three times the LTE subs. Other three operators are also deep into their LTE deployments. Verizon reported that 90% of its total data traffic is on the LTE network now, clearly the fastest technology transitions we have seen in the US wireless industry.

Your feedback is always welcome.

Chetan Sharma

We will be keeping a close eye on the trends in the wireless data sector in our blog, twitter feeds, future research reports, articles, and our annual thought-leadership summit – Mobile Future Forward. The next US Wireless Data Market update will be released in April 2016.

Disclaimer: Some of the companies mentioned in this update are our clients.

Mobile World Congress 2016 Observations February 29, 2016

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,5G,ARPU,Chetan Sharma Consulting,Connected Devices,Connected Intelligence Era,Disruption,Enterprise Mobility,LTE,Mobile 2016,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Future Forward,Mobile World Congress,MWC,NFV,SDN,Technology Cycles,The Golden Age of Mobile,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

Mobile World Congress 2016 Observations

The second of grand slams of mobile events – Mobile World Congress has become the marquee events that helps get the pulse of the industry as to where things are headed for the year. With the attendance topping 100K for the first time, it is a massive undertaking and brings all major players in the ecosystem from all corners of the world. Vegas could learn a thing or two from Barcelona on how to host big events. Some of the major themes were predictable like 5G, IoT, and VR. Others were important but not widely talked about in public settings. This note presents the summary of our observations from the show.

5G – 5G entered industry’s consciousness last year and the activity around the globe has just caught fire since then. Each week there is a new trial announced. Last year, there were more questions about 5G than answers. Some of the questions are starting to get answered now and we are getting clarity on others. However, the specification timeline still stays around 2019 with full standard deployments not before 2020. Given the trial activity and the progress in the labs, there is a good possibility, that there might be some consensus on higher frequency use specifications especially around indoor and dense outdoor networks.

I had a chance to visit with a number of CTOs of major players and these guys are not the ones who give into hyperbole. As an engineer, I left the show quite optimistic about the solutions and technologies that will become part of the 5G portfolio.

Verizon was the first one to announce results from some early tests in the field – 10 Gbps for potential fixed wireless deployments. Nokia and DT both showed sub millisecond radio delay which is quite an achievement. Ericsson showed the power of beamforming to gain really high capacity at short distances. 25-30 Gbps was common in most of the lab setups. SDN/NFV will provide the key underpinning to the 5G architecture but it didn’t surface much in the discussions.

Fundamentally, 5G will be driven by economics not just technology. Europe’s quixotic approach to spectrum auction in 2000s led to a decade long stagnation that left Europe behind. To attain leadership in 5G and on the next wave of technology evolution of Connected Intelligence, policy, technology, and strategy have to work hand-in-hand in a country to gain an upper hand. Some of my thoughts mentioned in the Economist and WSJ.

We will be covering 5G and its implications in future papers and at Mobile Future Forward in Sept.

Gigabit Society – While 5G is still a ways off, work goes on the LTE front. Industry hit a major milestone of a 1B LTE subs. Lot of the 5G enhancements will also be available in 4G being termed as 4.5G, Xtreme LTE, pre5G, 5G ready, and really-really advanced LTE. Infact, many of the features talked about in 5G are going to be available in the 4G evolution path. Qualcomm showcased their X16 chipset capable of reaching 1Gbps by combining 10 100Mbps streams.

4th Wave – In 2011, we put forth the 4th wave theory and 5 years later, we are seeing the 4th wave in full effect. As I mentioned to the Economist and the WSJ, the value is moving to the applications and services layer. Operators who will invest to become “solutions providers” will be better positioned for the future vs. the ones who are purely “access providers.” We are seeing the theory play out in front of our eyes. In 2014, US became the first country where the 4th wave revenues were greater than the access revenues. We expect this to occur in every major market over the course of next few years. Operators such as AT&T, Verizon, Telefonica, DoCoMo, KDDI, and Orange are benefiting from becoming solution providers. The new found revenue speaks for itself (more on this next week in our US Market Update for 2015).

Ericsson – Amazon Cloud Deal – Ericsson and Amazon struck a clever cloud deal that helps mobile operators use the AWS framework while creating a framework to be in compliance with the safe harbor provisions of sovereign nations. Win-Win-Win for sure.

The Ad wars – Instead of innovating, the ad industry as a whole took shortcuts and the end result was the bombardment of useless ads with no frequency control. Consumers are responding by embracing ad-blockers. Operators view this trend as an opportunity to stall the OTTs. Some of it is genuine concern for the consumers who get slapped with ads which consume good portion of their data bucket and deteriorate the experience sometimes to a point of making the browsing completely unusable especially when network conditions are less than favorable. Operator 3 in Europe working with startup Shine is taking the stance to block out the ads inviting the scorn of the ad industry and a peek of curiosity from the regulators. It is unlikely to be an effective strategy. However, it clearly is an opportunity for the ad industry to step up and design new frameworks that are consumer friendly. When we wrote the first mobile advertising book at the dawn of the birth of the modern mobile advertising industry, we had proposed several ideas that use the data to enhance the consumer experience and ecosystem strength but we clearly have a lot of work to do.

Verizon XO investment – Verizon’s XO deal of $1.8B didn’t get much attention but it was a brilliant deal appreciated by the folks who really understand what is going on. Verizon gets a fiber network and more important wireless spectrum (28 and 39 GHz) suited for 5G.

Resurrection of RCS – RCS has been a poster child of inability of operators to work together on a global scale w.r.t applications. The growth of IP messaging is well documented. Not only did operators miss out but Google did as well. Now that messaging is emerging as a new potential commerce and engagement platform, this is an attempt by Google to take a shot at the messaging opportunity. A number of things have to go right for this program to work so the probability is stacked against it.

Facebook TIP – Having shaped the IT infrastructure, Facebook is focusing on influencing the telecom infrastructure stack. The focus is going to commoditize the stack and open source it. Some big names are joining the effort like Nokia, Intel, and DT.

Connecting the next billion takes a back seat – Last year, one of the big theme emerging out of MWC was the focus on connecting the next billion. The talk of 5G drowned out any discussion of connecting the unconnected. The show did discuss using balloons, drones, satellites unlicensed spectrum to lower the cost of access. The unintended consequence of FreeBasics ruling might be a dampening effect on experimenting with alternative business models to support low cost access in emerging markets in the short-term.

Net Neutrality – NN has become an emotionally charged debate. Regulators around the world are grappling with how to understand and regulate through the complex prism of the future. Regulators are rushing to issue their rulings based on the world they saw in the past not the society and how it is going to react to applications and services in the future. Participants are getting bolder in their approach and interpretation of Net Neutrality. T-Mobile’s Binge-On is being watched by operators worldwide and the regulators are trying to understand what it means in their local market.

Regulations for the new age – Some of the regulations in the communications space are over a 100-year-old. Communications itself has drastically changed though the principle of transferring the bits from point A to B remains the same. T-Mobile reported that 50% of its voice calls are are on VoLTE. IP messaging is many times the SMS global volume. Gradually, almost all voice and messaging will be on the IP layer – voice and messaging will just become apps on the data layer. So pretending and regulating these services as if it were 2000 doesn’t help. An ideal strategy for consideration should be that the IP layer gets regulated for fair pricing, competition, and consumer good while everything on the top of the IP layer gets regulated on a “same service, same rules” principle. The interconnection between apps to deliver services like connection to PSTN, E911, etc. can be addressed by fair market pricing principles. VR is going to become the next communication platform; IP messaging the next application development and commerce platform. To keep the regulatory regime simple and in with the times, by focusing on the access layer, one can guarantee that whatever takes place on the top has the opportunity to grow as the market desires. Similarly, data rules across all apps and services on top of the IP layer should be the same irrespective of the provider. This market shift is required to make the market more competitive and fair.

IoT – IoT use cases are becoming more crisp and clear. There is steady growth in how IoT is getting integrated into both industrial and consumer worlds. As expected there are efforts underway to streamline and unfragment the stack. Intel and Qualcomm got together for the larger good of the industry under the Open Connectivity Foundation. We will be taking a deep dive into the IoT world at our upcoming Mobile Breakfast Series event in Vancouver.

eSIM – eSIM is potentially one of the biggest disruptive force our industry has seen in some time. If you connect the dots into the future, it is becoming clear that there is significant tension along the fault lines. Regulators better get ahead of this wave in time.

VRthe next communication platform – The emerging world of VR/AR is quite exciting. The technology is getting there. One of the key 5G use cases is going to be VR as it will require high capacity delivery of bits to the headset. However, VR sales are not going to go through the roof anytime soon. Some of the same things that plagued Google glasses – price, performance, and dorkiness are going to impact the early days of VR (Google’s VR approach is actually more market friendly at this time) but it is exciting to see tech companies tackle a complex computing problem. I am looking forward to new experiences across different domains.

Security, Privacy, and the clash of the titans – Apple vs. FBI case was on the top of the mind of executives. It wasn’t being discussed openly for obvious reasons but it came up in discussions almost every day. It is a complex issue that has to be looked from the perspective of enforcement in international jurisdictions. Operators have been forced to comply with similar requests for years. It will be an interesting battle, something that every tech company, every govt. around the world is paying close attention to.

Handset launches – Samsung launched S7, LG showed G5, Xiaomi announced Mi5, Huawei had its MateBook which probably was the sleekest device at MWC this year. Overall, only incremental improvements while the industry awaits new ideas to surface.

Disruption from 3.5 GHz – When I talked to the White House last year about 5G, I focused on stressing that Bits/s/Hz/Km2/joule/$ will be a key 5G performance consideration. FCC has done well by making the 3.5 Ghz available to the industry. Given that 70-80% of data consumption is indoors, unlicensed WiFi+LTE can be used to provide a much better economics esp. for enterprise customers. Players of various stripes are taking a serious look at it – Ericsson, Lemko, Google, Nokia, and others. Expect more news to come during the first half of the year.

Sigfox/Lora vs. NB-LTE – Sigfox/Lora remind me of WiMax. WiMax is remembered for its role in accelerating LTE deployments. While Sigfox/Lora started the process of creating a network and business model suited for IoT, it forced the 3GPP members to come up with NB-LTE (in a hurry) and with the growing support of the ecosystem behind it, it is hard to see how in the long-run a non-standard approach can win out.

Wearables – It seemed like the hype around consumer wearables has died down at MWC this year. No new concepts. Industry has to get the basics right first. However, there is good progress on the enterprise front where the use cases and requirements are clear. There are a number of companies who are working to make wearables/VR/AR a reality in the enterprise space.

Misc – Selfie security (Mastercard), Gesture user interfaces, Stripe’s Atlas platform, Mobile Connect (2B enabled consumers), AT&T $10B investment to expand globally, Paypal loves NFC after all, Smart Cities, Mobile Commerce initiatives, Media and Telco convergence, Operator data monetization, Alternate connectivity solutions (drones, balloons, lasers, etc.), Digital divide, 1B LTE subs.

Booth of the year: Ericsson by a distance

Party of the year: Siris Capital, Qualcomm

Your feedback is always welcome.

Chetan Sharma

We will be keeping a close eye on the trends in the wireless data sector in our blog, twitter feeds, future research reports, articles, and our annual thought-leadership summit – Mobile Future Forward. The next US Wireless Data Market update will be released in March 2016.

Disclaimer: Some of the companies mentioned in this update are our clients.

Vancouver Mobile Breakfast Series Recap: Mobile Commerce and Payments April 16, 2015

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,Chetan Sharma Consulting,Mobile 2015,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Commerce,Mobile Future Forward,The Golden Age of Mobile,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

We hosted our second event of the year in Vancouver (our first in Canada) earlier this week and had a great time. I have been going to Vancouver for 20+ years and have been thinking about doing something north of the border. It is also one of my favorite cities in the world. By strange coincidence, all 3 of our MBS cities outside Seattle have been Olympic cities – Atlanta, London, and now Vancouver. I guess we will have to go to Beijing or Seoul next.

With the help of my good friend Pankaj Agarwal and his team at Optimus Information and Wavefront, we were able to plan out a sold-out event. We continued the theme of Mobile Commerce and Payments given that it is such a hot topic right now and brought together three startup CEOs who are right in the middle of the action.

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The mobile ecosystem is evolving exactly we envisioned it in our 4th wave paper in 2012. The 4th wave is becoming the most dominant portion of the revenue stream as was witnessed from the revenue results in 2014 in the US.

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As I have said before in various public forums, one of the metrics I use to track progress in any segment is the number of $1B businesses being created each year. In 2012, there were only 9 companies mostly large enterprises like AT&T, Apple, Google, and Amazon that had > $1B digital businesses. However, in 2014, this number jumped to 37 with several new entrants – from known brands like Twitter, Walmart, and Xiaomi but several companies unknown to the western world like WeChat, FlipKart, Otto Group, GungHo, Suning Appliance, and others. While most of the concentration of digital wealth in the US, China is emerging very strongly as a player to reckon with. In fact, how China and US companies interact and play will perhaps define the next 10 years. While other economies like India, EU will play a role, I find China and US to be the most fascinating.

The speakers were:

Sam Gadodia, CEO & Co-Founder, Lotusflare

Sam co-founded LotusFlare with couple of his colleagues from Facebook with the objective to make mobile internet more accessible across the globe. Prior to LotusFlare, Sam worked at facebook and worked with Mobile Operators’ on SMS, Zero rating and other initiatives to drive growth on FB mobile app. Before this, Sam built and scaled TeleSign, one of the leaders in mobile authentication and verification space. Sam also co-founded and successfully built Global eProcure, a leading SaaS based SCM analytics Company with operation spanning from North America to Asia. While at Global eProcure, he received the Stevie award and was named by American Business Awards as Best Operation Executive.

Michael Gokturk, CEO & Founder, Payfirma

Michael Gokturk is the kind of entrepreneur who takes a company public in 3 years then launches a new business 3 days later. In 2011, Michael founded Payfirma with the goal of disrupting the highly competitive payments market by creating a solution to merge online, in-store and mobile payments. He has since grown Payfirma from the first company to introduce mobile payments in Canada into one of the top multichannel payment platforms. Before Payfirma, Michael founded and was the CEO of Versapay. A payments company specializing in point of sale systems and electronic bill presentment and payment (EBPP).

Ajay Hans, CEO and Co-Founder, Mobetize

Ajay Hans, Founder of Alligato Inc. and Co-Founder of Mobetize Corp brings over 15 years of diverse experience in the development, marketing and implementation of complex billing and payment related software technologies dedicated for MNO’s and MVNO’s. Ajay has overseen Mobetizes’ strategic vision and tactical execution since inception. He has held senior executive positions with leading telecom software technology companies where he successfully implemented solutions for brands including SaskTel, Sprint and AT&T.

Chetan Sharma, CEO and Founder, Chetan Sharma Consulting (moderator)

The three panelists are involved in advertising, payments, and commerce working with all parts of the value chain – banks, operators, startups, credit card companies, retailers, etc. We had a very interesting discussion that covered a breadth of topics.

The salient points of the session were:

In summary, mobile commerce remains a hot area and we are approaching a tipping point wherein mobile commerce dominates ecommerce in all parts of the world. I really enjoyed the moderation and questions from the audience. My thanks to Optimus Information and Wavefront for being our partners for the event. and thanks to the Vancouver mobile community for embracing us with open arms.

Our next event is going to be in our annual mobile summit – Mobile Future Forward on Sept 29th in Seattle. Stay tuned for announcements and details.

Mobile Breakfast Series Recap: Mobile Commerce and Payments February 18, 2015

Posted by chetan in : Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Commerce,Mobile Payments,The Golden Age of Mobile,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

We hosted our first event of the year yesterday and were blessed with some terrific weather and views of the picturesque Puget Sound. This year we want to tackle the topic of mobile commerce and payments. In our annual predictions survey for 2015, Mobile Payments emerged as the breakthrough category for the year. Additionally, mobile commerce is just booming in all parts of the world with some very interesting implications for the ecosystem.

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One of the metrics I use to track progress in any segment is the number of $1B businesses being created each year. In 2012, there were only 9 companies mostly large enterprises like AT&T, Apple, Google, and Amazon that had > $1B digital businesses. However, in 2014, this number jumped to 37 with several new entrants – from known brands like Twitter, Walmart, and Xiaomi but several companies unknown to the western world like WeChat, FlipKart, Otto Group, GungHo, Suning Appliance, and others. While most of the concentration of digital wealth in the US, China is emerging very strongly as a player to reckon with. In fact, how China and US companies interact and play will perhaps define the next 10 years. While other economies like India, EU will play a role, I find China and US to be the most fascinating.

We had a terrific group to discuss the mobile commerce and payments trends, folks who are in the trenches making things happen on a daily basis and come to the problem from different angles.

Sebastien Taveau, VP and Chief Developer Evangelist, MasterCard

Sebastien serves as Chief Developer Evangelist for the Open API team at MasterCard where he leads the outreach to the global developer community. Puzzle solver, strategic thinker, beyond-the-horizon watcher and hands-on doer, Sebastien has technical and professional experience spans more than 20 years in various industries. He was previously with Validity as CTO and Paypal leading the technology integration efforts.

Prat Vemana, VP – Mobile and Commerce, Staples

Prat leads Staples’ eCommerce product teams responsible for the online customer experience (CX) on desktop, mobile and retail-store digital interactions. He also manages global shared services teams for onsite search, user experience research, architecture, A/B testing and analytics. Prior to his current role, Prat lead Staples’ Velocity Lab in Cambridge and drove the company’s global mobile strategy. Prat’s product and CX teams operate out of the company’s corporate headquarters in Framingham, Massachusetts and Staples Labs across the country, including Cambridge, Seattle and San Mateo.

Sam Liang, CEO and Co-Founder, Alohar Mobile

Sam Liang is CEO and Co-Founder of Alohar Mobile. Previously, Sam was the platform architect and lead of Google Location Server and API, which powers thousands of mobile applications on Android and iOS. Sam held a number of patents in wireless and mobile technologies. Sam has a Ph.D. in EE from Stanford University. Alohar was acquired by Alibaba, now the 4th largest tech firm on the planet.

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(Source: Alohar Mobile)

The salient points of discussions were:

We covered a range of topics. Mobile Commerce is driving the 4th wave for sure with so many interesting ideas and companies popping up every month. As usual, I had a lot of fun moderating the panel and engaging the audience. Thanks to all who joined and we will be in touch regarding future events. For now, we are expanding the breakfast series to Vancouver where we will host an event on April 14th and our Mobile Future Forward annual summit will take place on Sept 29th. Stay tuned for more announcements.

Thanks and see you around.

Mobile Breakfast Series–IoT–London July 3, 2014

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,Chetan Sharma Consulting,Internet of Things,IoT,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Ecosystem,Mobile Future Forward,Smart Cities,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

We hosted our Europe Mobile Breakfast Series in London last month in partnership with Telefonica and they have been gracious host for the series. The topic of discussion was “Internet of Things: Exploring the next big thing in mobile.” Regular readers will notice that it is the same topic we covered in our Seattle breakfast event in March. IoT is gaining lot of share of the news cycle and investments from big companies like GE and Caterpillar to startups like Fitbit and Smart Things. Many traditional computing and communications players like Telefonica, AT&T, Intel, Qualcomm, Microsoft, Google and others are also plunging full-steam ahead into the segment.

I have written about the notion of the coming “Golden Age of Mobile” and IoT, IMHO fits right into that growth strategy. In previous notes, I suggested that:

It is very clear to us that we are entering the ‘Connected Intelligence’ era. These two operative words are going to define the next phase of human evolution and are going to dramatically change every industry vertical from the ground up.

We are starting to see the signs in all directions. We had assembled a great panel to delve into some of the early opportunities, solutions to problems, and the traction areas. Executives from BMW, Intel, Telefonica, and Worldsensing were at hand to share their opinions and experiences in the space.

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Dominik Fromm is responsible for expanding BMW Group’s Mobility Services in the United Kingdom under the BMW, MINI and BMW i brands. Strategy, Mobility and Financial Services have been his professional focus in recent years. The current work builds on this wealth of experience, gained whilst working in the United Kingdom and in BMW’s global headquarters in Munich.

Raine Bergstrom is a vice president in the Software and Services Group at Intel Corporation and general manager of API Services. He takes the lead on market and product definition, as well as the execution of API management. He also defines the IoT Services Platform strategy, helping deliver a true end-to-end IoT solution for some of Intel’s largest customers.

Carlos de otto Morera is an economist educated in the United Kingdom. He has now 15 years of international experience including entrepreneurial experience in mobile, hardware and Internet startups. Created the largest online music platform in Spain from 2008 till 2012. Deeply passionate about his job designing and manufacturing connected products. Currently running Thinking Things, connected Hardware initiative from Telefónica.

Mischa Dohler is Chair Professor in Wireless Communications at King’s College London, UK. He is Distinguished Lecturer of IEEE ComSoc, Senior Member of the IEEE, and Editor-in-Chief of ETT. He frequently features as keynote speaker and had press coverage by BBC and Wall Street Journal. He is a tech company investor and also entrepreneur, being the cofounder, former CTO and now with the Board of Directors of Worldsensing.

So, as you can see, we had quite an eclectic group of individuals with diverse backgrounds and perspectives.

To recap, as we stand today, here are some of the forecasts:

In 2011, Ericsson forecasted 50 Billion Connected Devices by 2020

In 2012, Cisco agreed with the forecast and said they too expect the same number of connected devices and in 2013 came out with a paper talking about a $14.4 Trillion economy powered by IoE

In 2013, GE came out with their research and paper on the Industrial Internet powered by sensors and calculated that we could see $10-15 trillion dollar impact on the GDP in the next 20 years.

The salient points of the discussions were:

Overall, it was a great discussion on the practical aspects of IoT and the audience was great in keeping us honest. I always enjoy interacting with the London mobile crowd and this time was no different. My thanks to the attendees, the partners, the speakers, and to Telefonica for making this event possible.

Given the importance of the topic, we will be dealing with it again at our annual summit Mobile Future Forward on Sept 24th in Seattle and will have more speakers talking about their perspectives and experiences on IoT including GE.

Mobile Breakfast Series: IoT Q&A with Telefonica June 9, 2014

Posted by chetan in : Internet of Things,IoE,IoT,Mobile Breakfast Series,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

We are delighted to have Carlos de otto Morera, CEO of Thinking Things at Telefonica join the panel next week. Carlos is an economist educated in the United Kingdom. He has 15 years of international experience including entrepreneurial experience in mobile, hardware and Internet startups.  He created the largest online music platform in Spain from 2008 till 2012. He is deeply passionate about his job designing and manufacturing connected products. Carlos is joined by execs from BMW, Intel, and Worldsensing and we will be exploring the opportunities in the “Internet of Things” world.

We caught up with Carlos to get a preview of our upcoming Mobile Breakfast Series event in London on June 17th.

Why did you and Telefónica start Thinking Things? Is it about simplification or are there more benefits to the modular approach?

Telefónica R&D created the Physical Internet Lab to design specific solutions using connected hardware. After a few projects for different customers, the Lab realized that we were always tackling the same problems: sensoring or measuring, communications and intelligence (SW) for many different types of problems. Thinking Things was created so all those cases could be solved through a seamless solution that allows you to measure, collect and act on the information. It has been designed in a way that allows anyone unfamiliar with hardware to create specific solutions to specific problems thanks to connected hardware. This modular approach allows one to create objects with different functionalities by simply buying new modules with different sensors on top of the basic modules.

What are couple of examples of how it is being used today?

Thinking Things is being used currently by one of the largest Medical Analysis companies in Europe. This company carries a large number of fridges from one lab to another (around the continent). It is very important for them to ensure the quality of samples contained. Thanks to Thinking Things they can track temperature around the clock of all fridges and samples around Europe.

We are working together with large logistics companies to help them track expensive items being deliver around the world. Sometimes these items, especially expensive ones get stolen. Thinking Things can be inside these packages and inform whenever these packages have been open, so central systems are aware in real time of any wrong doing.

How can developers be involved in using the Thinking Things toolkit?

Thinking Things has been designed for all those app and web developers and digital product designers that need and want to build new connected products and services. We provide them with an easy to use, plug and play solution where, by buying our connected hardware are able to build such products and services. Thinking Things comes with battery, different types of sensors and a connections device together with cloud services so by just using our API, you can build any software specific solutions on top.

Our back-end software allows you to access your data, as well as allows you to create rules and ways to interact with the devices.

What are you doing on the software-side of things and with data?

Thinking Things is a hardware project within Telefónica. But it’s a connected product so we developed our own front-end and back-end software platform to satisfy the needs of Thinking Things users and developers. On the front-end side of things, we provide users with all necessary functionality so you can use Thinking Things right away. In any case we are aware of the fact that developers want to build their specific solutions therefore we provide an open API so they can freely create on top of the framework.

Data as of today will be used by owners of end products and their end customers for whatever purpose those products are created. We foresee though that considering that a large variety of products can be built, data generated may be of interest to third parties allowing both Telefónica and developers to exploit it commercially.

Venue: Telefonica, 20 Air Street, London, W1B 5AN London, UK

When: June 17th. Breakfast and Registration: 8-9am, Panel Discussion: 9-10:30am, Networking: 10:30-11:30am

Registration

Internet of Things: Exploring the next big thing in mobile

Prof. Mischa Dohler, King’s College, London and Cofounder, Worldsensing

Dominik Fromm, GM – Mobility Services, BMW

Carlos de otto Morera, CEO, Thinking Things, Telefonica

Raine Bergstrom, VP and GM, Intel

Chetan Sharma, President, Chetan Sharma Consulting (moderator)

Look forward to seeing you next week.

Mobile Breakfast Series: IoT Q&A with Intel May 28, 2014

Posted by chetan in : Intel,Intellectual Property,Internet of Things,IoE,IoT,Mobile Breakfast Series , add a comment

We are delighted to have Raine Bergstrom, VP and GM at Intel participate on our panel. We caught up with to get a preview of our upcoming Mobile Breakfast Series event in London on June 17th in partnership with Telefonica.

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Raine is joined by execs from BMW, Telefonica and Worldsensing and we are exploring the opportunities in the “Internet of Things” world.

1. There is a lot of investment buzz around the IoT. M2M and similar concepts have been around a long time. What’s your sense of why there is interest and activity?

While the core use cases and actual implementations have been around for years in what could be defined as “IoT”, we have seen the maturing of several core paradigms across hardware, software and services. This maturation enables enterprises to accelerate the scale, security, and ability to take to market new IoT business models and not just one-off solutions.

2. Intel is considered a major player in the IoT segment both from the chipset point of view as well as the services. How does Intel see the IoT opportunities?

For Intel, IoT’s synergy of software and hardware is perfectly aligned with our hardware and software portfolios. End-to-end solutions need devices to collect data, but also require software and services, particularly API management and big data, to realize the value of that data. Intel is uniquely situated to provide a silicon to cloud solution that IoT customers can depend on.

3. What specific segments or verticals are seeing more traction than others? Why?

IoT has the potential to modernize rapidly in Smart Cities, Fleet, Manufacturing, Automotive, and the Public Sector. These are all early leaders due to the heavy logistics and wide variety of legacy devices in play today. The more interesting question is what happens in Phase 2 of IoT using the IoT data that is collected and monetized.

4. As you look at the IoT opportunity down the road, say 5 years out, where will be the most value reside in the stack?

There will be two value segments, the IoT platform that is scalable across segments and the vertical solutions for each industry. API management will be central to any platform that allows the aggregation of APIs and the services they create. The Vertical solutions will require deep segment knowledge, but still leverage a platform. Launching products today is not just a matter of designing for current partners and customers. It’s about designing API programs that aim to target entire industries.

Raine Bergstrom is a vice president in the Software and Services Group at Intel Corporation and general manager of API Services. He takes the lead on market and product definition, as well as the execution of API management. He also defines the IoT Services Platform strategy, helping deliver a true end-to-end IoT solution for some of Intel’s largest customers.

Prior to Intel, Raine was an executive and founder of several successful startups, and led software groups for Microsoft, AOL/Time Warner and Adobe. He holds multiple patents in mobile messaging and formerly served as a director of the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA).

Mobile Breakfast Series: Internet of Things March 23, 2014

Posted by chetan in : Internet of Things,IoE,IoT,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Future Forward,US Wireless Market,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

Internet of Things: Exploring the next big thing in mobile

We hosted our first Mobile Breakfast Series of the year at Columbia Tower Club last week and the topic was Internet of Things (IoT). IoT is the hottest thing in the mobile industry right now with investment pouring in from all sides. Our expert panel took a deeper look into the opportunities, the hype, and the challenges in the evolving mobile segment. Mobile Breakfast Series works to bring you the current thoughts, expert brains, and probing questions about the main issues of the day.

Internet of Things (IoT) has been hailed as the next big thing in the mobile industry. As connections from objects and things interconnect with existing and new end points, the networked effect can provide tremendous opportunities; reshape existing processes, user experiences, and expectations. But, really, how real is IoT and what will it take to reach the billions of dollars promised. Will it fundamentally alter how we do things? We are starting to see signs of tremendous progress. GE is investing $4B+ into its version of IoT – the industrial Internet and it is making the difference in operations and machine learning. Connected consumers’ gadgets are enabling us to lead healthier lives, work more efficiently, and manage our time more effectively.

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We had a superstar panel discussing the IoT evolution from different angles.

Bobby Morrison, President, Verizon PNW has his ears to the ground as he works with his customers big and small on using mobile to solve real-world problem that improves productivity and financial performance. Verizon is one the top digital operators in the world who understands the implications of the 4th wave and is investing appropriately.

Tim Moss, SVP, Ericsson was one the key guys behind the analysis that led to the 50 Billion connected devices paper in 2011. He has 20+ years of experience in the industry and worked across many verticals so has a real deep understanding how mobile can be incorporated in various industries.

Chris Murphy, Director, Brand Communications and Digital Marketing, adidas US is close to the consumers as to what matters most. Companies like adidas don’t introduce technology in their products for the sake of technology. Each mistake can be costly if it is not well thought out. It doesn’t mean that are constantly tinkering at the edges. His team has been introducing new concepts and new ways to engage the consumer throughout their

Shankar Chandran, VP, Samsung Catalyst Fund is part of the new investment group at Samsung in Silicon Valley who is looking to invest in cutting edge startups and technologies in both hardware and software that can give Samsung and its ecosystem an edge. His areas of interest are IoT, cloud, security, mHealth, and next-generation user interfaces. Samsung is one of the top 3 important players in the mobile and technology ecosystem.

From wearables to automobiles to industrial automation, the use cases are endless and we are just trying to make sense of what such a connected world will mean to productivity, human behavior, safety, privacy, and the society at large.

As we stand today, here are some of the forecasts:

In 2011, Ericsson forecasted 50 Billion Connected Devices by 2020

In 2012, Cisco agreed with the forecast and said they too expect the same number of connected devices and in 2013 came out with a paper talking about a $14.4 Trillion economy powered by IoE

In 2013, GE came out with their research and paper on the Industrial Internet powered by sensors and calculated that we could see $10-15 trillion dollar impact on the GDP in the next 20 years.

So, these are massive numbers. It does feel like we are entering a new phase of technology growth due to connected sensors, what I call the “Golden Age of Mobile” and I was seen that in my work in both developing and developed nations that the use cases are everywhere. In many instances, developing countries are not waiting but leapfrogging some of the developed nations. So, very exciting times ahead.

The salient point of discussions were:

I really enjoyed the discussion and we covered quite a bit of ground. As usual, the audience were well informed and did their homework.

Given the importance of the topic, we are expanding our Mobile Breakfast Series on IoT and going back to London this summer and in partnership with Telefonica hosting a session on IoT on June 17th. Hope our friends and colleagues in western Europe can join us.

We will also more details on our annual summit Mobile Future Forward in September. Stay tuned for more details.

Thanks and see you around.

Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – Mobile Platforms and the future of HTML5 June 12, 2013

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,Chetan Sharma Consulting,HTML5,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Future Forward,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

We hosted our 15th Mobile Breakfast Series event yesterday. The topic was – Is HTML5 Really Disruptive?

HTML5 has been talked about for a long time as the most disruptive force for mobile applications since the Apple Appstore was launched 5 years ago. But, can it really change the industry dynamics? How do you solve the reach problem for the developers? Many interesting initiatives in 2013 like Firefox OS but will they make a difference? How do developers view HTML5?

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The platform wars are not new, they have been around since computing evolved. The discussion and debate just morphs into the flavor of the day. In the recent past, smartphones and tablets have redefined computing as we know it. The vitality and strength of any ecosystem is determined by the number of app developers developing for a platform and actively monetizing. Right now there are only two sheriffs in town – for units it is Android and for revenue it is iOS. Others play on the fringes. HTML5 has been in the discussion for a while and whether it can stand on its own as a platform has been a matter of great debate amongst the participants of the trade. As usual, we had an outstanding line of speakers which over a 100 years in combined experience in the mobile space, which is just phenomenal. These guys have worked with all the major computing and device companies so the depth of understanding of real issues, challenges, and opportunity really showed. The panelists were:

Hank Skorny – VP/GM – Software Services, Intel. Hank is a veteran of the platform industry with successful stints at Apple, AOL Mobile, Microsoft, Adobe, Infospace Mobile, and now with Intel. He recently acquired Mashery and Aepona to beef up the Open API initiative for enterprises, operators, and developers.

Jeff Warren – VP – Mobile and Online Partner Marketing, Expedia. Jeff previously worked at Motorola and his team has been doing some great work in mobile at Expedia, a real example of how companies are adapting to the 4th wave that I have been talking about.

Asokan Ashok – Director – Content and Services, Samsung. Ashok has worked for Motorola, Nokia, Ericsson, HP, and now with Samsung. You can say, he knows a thing or two about devices.

Sundeep Peechu – Partner, Felicis Ventures. Remember Rovio or rather Angry Birds. Well, he was one of the early believers and investors when it was not fashionable to invest in apps. Now it is a multi-billion dollar industry. Felicis itself is fairly impressive. Just in 6-7 years, they have made 100+ investment with 46 exits.

I kicked off the discussion with an animation of how the market shares have changed in the smartphone space since 2004 from Symbian, Windows and Blackberry to iOS and Android. We do seem to go in cycles. Are we on the tip of another cycle?

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Source: © Chetan Sharma Consulting, 2013

Not a complete change but Hank made the case for HTML5 and articulate a well reasoned thesis that HTML5 is not going to be disruptive because it is the web but rather due the economic reasons. Companies are just running out of people they can hire to build apps and HTML5 provides a solution with more trained staff and cheaper cost of development.

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Source: © Hank Skorny, Intel, 2013

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Source: © Hank Skorny, Intel, 2013

Below is the summary of the discussion:

HTML5 needs a champion

Is it the economics, stupid?

Enterprise to lead the way

HTML5 needs to solve

The world is not either/or

What do consumers think?

All in all, a great discussion. Had insightful questions and comments from the audience as well who are well-plugged into the debate.

Thanks for all those who came and participated. My thanks to the speakers for making the time to share their insights.

Next, our Mobile Future Forward Summit is coming up on Sept 10. The early bird expires this friday so make sure you grab your tickets.

We also released our Mobile Future Forward Research Series Paper –

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It goes into details about why some players are successful in the device space and others aren’t. You can download it here.

Thanks and have a great rest of the month.

Mobile Breakfast Series – Dallas – LTE & Beyond: The future of mobile networks April 3, 2013

Posted by chetan in : 4G,4th Wave,LTE,Mobile Breakfast Series,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

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We are pleased to announce Mobile Breakfast Series is coming to Dallas for the first time. Below are some details about the program:

Mobile Breakfast Series – Excellent Speakers. Invaluable Insights. Peerless Networking.

Mobile Breakfast Series is a quarterly event that brings together thought leaders and visionaries from the global mobile industry to interact and share ideas, insights, and best practices with the entrepreneurs, enthusiasts, and everyone who is passionate about mobile. We dive into the most important issues and opportunities in front of our industry with the executives who are making things happen.

Date: June 25th, 2013

Time: 7:30-11am. 7:30am – Registration, 8:30am – Discussion Begins, 10:00am – Networking

Venue: Tower Club, 1601 Elm Street, Thanksgiving Tower, 48th Floor, Dallas, TX 75201

Registration is open now.

Topic: LTE and Beyond – The future of mobile networks

US is leading the globe in LTE deployment. In fact, most of the cutting-edge engineering with mobile networks is happening here with all major operators deploying LTE. What’s next for mobile networks? How will they evolve over the course of the next decade? Will we be able to keep ahead of the insatiable consumer demand for more? We will have an in-depth discussion with our distinguished speakers.

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Fireside Chat:

Kris Rinne, Senior Vice President – Network Technologies, AT&T Labs

Vish Nandlall, Chief Technology Officer & Head of Strategy, Ericsson

Chetan Sharma, President, Chetan Sharma Consulting (moderator)

Kris Rinne, SVP – Network Technologies, AT&T Labs

Kris Rinne is responsible for network architecture, service platforms, radio access roadmap and initial implementation, wireless device requirements and certification, network platforms, network performance analysis, and industry standards development at AT&T. Previously, Rinne served as Cingular’s chief technology officer with similar responsibilities. She earlier served as vice president—Technology and Product Realization, responsible for new product development from a technology standpoint, handset certification, and infrastructure vendor coordination. Prior to joining Cingular, she was vice president—Technology Strategy for SBC Wireless, responsible for new product development and network operations support. She has worked for Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems as managing director—Operations. In 2011, Kris was named as “The Most Influential Woman in Wireless” by Fierce Wireless and was a member of the Global Telecom Business Power 100 list of the most powerful telecom executives.

Vish Nandlall, CTO and Head of Strategy, Ericsson

Vish Nandlall is Head of Strategy, Marketing and Chief Technology Officer for Ericsson’s North American region. He is responsible for identifying Ericsson’s long-term vision, defining the overall company strategy, and driving business value creation for Ericsson’s customers in North America. Nandlall joined Ericsson in 2010, most recently serving as Chief Technical Officer for the company’s AT&T Customer Unit. He previously served as CTO of Extreme Networks and CTO and distinguished member of technical staff for Nortel Carrier Networks. Nandlall has led architecture and standards direction for product portfolios ranging from GSM, CDMA, WiMAX, LTE, metro DWDM, carrier routing and switching, and carrier VoIP portfolios. His recent areas of research include M2M, augmented reality, and mobile virtualization.

Mobile Breakfast Series – June Events March 26, 2013

Posted by chetan in : HTML5,LTE,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Future Forward,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

Greetings,

It was awesome to see so many of you at the Mobile Breakfast Series Event last week. For those of you who couldn’t make it, here is the summary.

We also announced the date for our Mobile Future Forward program – Sept 10th in Seattle. Stay tuned for some really exciting announcements regarding speakers and the program.

Also pleased to announce the next two breakfast series events.

June 11th – Seattle – HTML5 – Is it really disruptive?

HTML5 has been talked about for a long time as the most disruptive force for mobile applications since the Apple Appstore was launched 5 years ago. But, can it really change the industry dynamics? How do you solve the reach problem for the developers? Many interesting initiatives in 2013 like Firefox OS but will they make a difference? How do developers view HTML5? We will take the pulse of the industry and ask the tough questions.

Hank Skorny, Vice President and GM – Consumer Software, Intel

June 25th – Dallas – LTE and Beyond – The Future of Mobile Networks

US is leading the globe in LTE deployment. In fact, most of the cutting-edge engineering with mobile networks is happening here with all major operators deploying LTE. What’s next for mobile networks? How will they evolve over the course of the next decade? Will we be able to keep ahead of the insatiable consumer demand for more?

Kris Rinne, Senior Vice President, Architecture and Network Planning, AT&T

Vish Nandlall, Chief Technology Officer and Head of Strategy, Ericsson

.. more speakers to be announced.

Registration is open now. First come, first served.

If you have any burning questions or any feedback, please feel free to send us a note.

Have a great spring and we will see you soon.

Thanks

Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – Cloud, SDN, and the art of mobile computing March 25, 2013

Posted by chetan in : 4th Wave,AORTA,Applications,ARPU,Big Data,Mobile Applications,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Cloud Computing,Privacy,Security,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , 2 comments

Mobile Breakfast Series entered its 5th year of operation this week with our first event of the year in Seattle. The topic of discussion was Cloud, SDN, and the art of mobile computing.

2012 has been an incredible year for mobile. Despite the global economic doldrums, mobile is a $1.5 trillion economy with new entrants, new disruptions, new devices, technologies, networks, etc. One of the major shifts is in how the revenue is generated for the industry. Mobile operators around the world capture over 85% of the industry’s profits. However, if you take a look at the top 5 global players by profits – it is China Mobile, Apple, Verizon, AT&T and DoCoMo. Still dominated by service providers but Apple wasn’t on the list 2 years back. So, how will the list look like 5 years from now?

There is a clear shift going on what I call “the fourth wave” i.e. industry’s new revenues are going to come from services and solutions. And mobile operators are not silent participants on this wave. Players like Verizon, AT&T, Telefonica, and DoCoMo are going toe-to-toe with the OTT or Internet players. If you remember the early 2000s, mobile data wasn’t even registering on the revenue scale; 10 years ago mobile data revenues were less than $1 billion per year in the US. Last year, we reported $79 billion, this year it will grow to $90 billion. In fact, we might see a shift where data revenues > voice revenues this year in the US. It has already happened in Japan, over 65% revenue coming from data. But what happens when data saturates, the revenue is going to come from fourth wave services and solutions. You will start to see operators break out revenues from digital services.

So, the question is what those services are – cloud is on top of the list, big data and analytics is on the top of that list? How are these going to be supported – by LTE network, buy SDN enabled network infrastructure? To discuss all of this we assembled a great panel.

Mitch Lewis, Vice President, Juniper Networks

Biju Nair,  EVP and Chief Corporate Strategy Officer of Synchronoss

Randy Wagner, Executive Director, B2B Sales and Marketing, Verizon Wireless

Louis Brun, Senior Vice President, Marketing and Product Strategy, Guavus

Chetan Sharma, President, Chetan Sharma Consulting (moderator)

Before we began, Mitch Lewis gave a talk on “Seven Leadership Principles From Everest” .. yes, you read it right, Everest. Mitch has not only climbed Everest but each of the 7 highest peaks on the 7 continents. If that were not enough, he has run 7 marathons on these continents as well. It was indeed a thrill and a privilege to host my friend Mitch and have him talk about his experiences and the lessons from a dream that he accomplished over the course of 8 years. Just a phenomenal achievement.

Below is his presentation and a video from his talk. Enjoy and get motivated.

 

 

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We could have just stopped there 🙂

But we had plenty to discuss on the state of mobile cloud computing and the emergence of SDN.

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Below is the summary of the discussion:

Cloud Computing

SDN

Privacy and Security

Big Data

As usual, it was a lively discussion and with the added presentation from Mitch, a memorable one indeed. Mobile cloud has become a layer of computing just like security or connectivity. This fundamental capability has led to a thousand new companies looking to move the art of computing a bit forward. Software Defined Networking is slated to disrupt the infrastructure in a big way, provide more flexibility to service providers and developers to create even more compelling services and user experiences.

We also announced the date of our 2013 Mobile Future Forward. On Sept 10th this year, leaders of the mobile industry will gather in Seattle to brainstorm the future of mobile. As usual, it is going to be a delight to host the best and brightest. So mark your calendars, make your plans, and we hope to see you there later this year. More news to come in the coming weeks.

Thanks to all those who attended and thanks to Synchronoss for being our series partner.

Chetan

Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – Mobile 2013 December 13, 2012

Posted by chetan in : Chetan Sharma Consulting,Mobile 2013,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Predictions , add a comment

The Mobile Breakfast Series Event returned back to its home ground in Seattle after a detour to Atlanta and London earlier this year. As is the tradition, we go into the pontification mode for the last event and assemble experts to help us gauge what’s going to be exciting in the coming year, the shakeups that are coming and what should we keep an eye on.

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The panelists were:

Zaw Thet, Advisor, Signia Venture Partners

Zaw is a veteran entrepreneur who has been at the forefront of search, social networking, mobile, and adtech since the age of 19. Most recently Zaw was the founder and CEO of 4INFO, one of the largest mobile advertising platforms in the world. Business Week recognized him as one the “Mobile Barons” helping to shape the mobile ad industry since 2004.

Omar Javaid, Managing Director, BBO Global

Omar is the managing director of BBO Global, a boutique advisory and early stage venture firm in the wireless and media space. Prior to BBO, Omar Javaid is Vice President, Product Management of Emerging Technologies Group at Motorola Mobility, a Google company. He was part of the executive team that lead the successful turn-around of Motorola, culminating in the $12.5B acquisition by Google. In this role, he was responsible for next generation smart phone and convergence products Motorola Mobility.

Tracy Isacke, Director of Investments and Business Development, Telefonica Digital

Tracy started her career at Xerox, rising to be the first female member of the UK Board, leading a team of over 450 people. Tracy joined Telefónica in 2006 as the head of the Enterprise Sales Team for O2 UK, then she led on Telefónica’s $207m acquisition of Jajah, the Valley-based VOIP/IP Telephony company. Tracy is currently spearheading the growth of Telefónica Digital as Director of Investments and Business Development, focusing primarily on Silicon Valley, Israel and Europe, with a growing team of half a dozen employees, based in Mountain View, Madrid, London and Tel Aviv.

Todd Achilles, VP, Mobility, Hewlett-Packard Company

Todd Achilles is Vice President, Mobility for HP’s Printing and Personal Systems business unit, where he leads strategy and execution for delivering a connected experience to HP customers. Todd has spent his career in product, marketing, sales and engineering roles within telecommunications sector, including leadership positions with HTC and T-Mobile USA.

What is in store for Mobile 2013?

2012 has been an incredible year for mobile. We crossed several key industry milestones – 6.5B subscriptions, 1B subscriptions in China, 1B broadband subscriptions, 500M android activations, Apple’s monstrous march towards $1T market cap. We also saw Amazon’s aggressive moves in the mobile space, Facebook eclipsing 1B active users, and Nokia/Microsoft/RIM trying to stem the tide. Some big M&A maneuvers throughout the year. All this is setting up a very exciting Mobile 2013. There was a lot to discuss – from the tussles of Apple and Android to opportunities in commerce and big data, from Microsoft’s comeback to challenges in managing the network growth and consumer expectations. We assembled a stellar panel of mobile veterans to help us brainstorm what the big trends, big movers and shakers, and the big opportunities of 2013.

Below is the summary of the discussion:

  • Post-PC or PC+
  • Mobile Platforms
  • Digital Telcos
  • Hardware
  • Commerce
  • Misc
  • It was a lively discussion and I could have easily gone on for another 2-3 hours. Our audience is always top-notch and is highly educated about the nuances of the industry as was evident from the questions. 2012 was the year when Mobile Breakfast Series spread its wings and went to Atlanta and London. We had a great time putting together each of the events in 2012 and we have many more planned for 2013, so stay tuned.

    Our annual thought-leadership summit – Mobile Future Forward returns in Sept 2013. More details to come.

    From all of us at Chetan Sharma Consulting, we wish you and yours a great holiday season and a terrific 2013.

    Finally, as we do it every year, we launched our Annual Mobile Predictions Survey for 2013. There will be prizes for the 25 lucky winners. Be sure to share your thoughts. The survey ends Dec 28th. We will release the results in January.

    Until then,

    have a good time.

    Chetan

    Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – London – Operator/OTT – The Way Forward July 5, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Operators,OTT,Wireless Value Chain , add a comment

    June has been a very exciting month for us at Chetan Sharma Consulting. We took our Mobile Breakfast Series first outside Seattle to Atlanta and then, last week, outside US to London. Both places, it was very well received and we thank all the partners, speakers, and attendees who helped us out. On Jun 29th, we hosted our first European Mobile Breakfast Series at Wayra, Telefonica in London. My thanks to the Telefonica team for hosting us and making the whole experience worry-free. The topic of the discussion was Operator/OTT – The Way Forward. Regular readers would remember, we did a Seattle Breakfast Event on the same topic earlier in June. Wanted to get the European flavor of the same hot topic.

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    Operator traditional revenue streams are under threat esp. voice and messaging. Access margins will continue to stay under pressure. OTT players are coming in fast and furious and it is not just the big ones like Google but also players like Whatsapp, Voxer, Viber and others. How do operators play in the new landscape – lessen the decline of their traditional revenues while investing in new areas that improve their overall margins and revenues. Do they play the role of an enabler, a utility player, or become the OTT player themselves? In a software-driven world, how do they stay nimble? On the flip side, what are some things that operators can provide to the OTT players that make them successful, take them to the market quickly and maintain a long-term healthy and mutually-beneficial partnership? Operators still generate 70% of the global mobile industry revenues, so they are an important part of the chain but how do they ensure they have an equally relevant share in the profits. The panel will discuss how operators and OTT players think about the challenges and the opportunities, the competition and the coopetition.

    To discuss the topic we had excellent panel with Jamie Finn, Director of Product Design at Telefonica Digital. This is a new unit within Telefonica that is doing some great work (recently released TU Me – a messaging application to compete with other VoIP/IP messaging apps) and Jamie is an integral part of the team.

    Jamie was joined by Dominique Rougié, Director, TV Interactive Services & Media, Digital Innovation, Orange Group. Dominique has an interesting perspective since he is responsible for services across the three channels – online, cable, and mobile. From the OTT side, we had Andreas Bernström Chief Executive Officer, Rebtel. Rebtel is the second largest VoIP player after Skype with over $80M in revenue slated for 2012. Finally, we had Frank Meehan who has been doing OTT for a long time first at 3Uk and then at INQMobile. Some of the earliest OTT integrations of Skype, Facebook, and Twitter came from his team.

    Some highlights from the discussion –

    I really enjoyed the discussion and audience participation. We now take a break from our Mobile Breakfast Series and focus our attention to our annual mobile executive summit – Mobile Future Forward which is going to be held on Sept 10th in Seattle. We have an extraordinary group of executives who are joining us and I hope you can too.

    Until then, have a great summer and see you soon.

    Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – Atlanta – Connected Devices, Cloud, and Consumer June 24, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : 3G,4G,AORTA,Applications,ARPU,Connected Devices,European Wireless Market,Mobile Advertising,Mobile Applications,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Cloud Computing,Mobile Commerce,Mobile Content,Mobile Devices,Mobile Ecosystem,Mobile Future Forward,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , 2 comments

    We started doing Mobile Breakfast Series in Seattle back in 2009 and after hosting10 straight events, it was time to expand the wings and explore other cities. The first stop in this journey was Atlanta and we worked closely with our partners at “Wireless Technology Forum” to make it a successful event last friday. I also had the good fortune of participating in WTF’s event the night before. Both events focused on Connected Devices and their impact on the consumer, the ecosystem and the value-chains thus making it a “connected week” in Atlanta.

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    As I mentioned, the night before the event, I had the opportunity to present and moderate a panel on Connected Devices with Glenn Lurie, President of Emerging Enterprises at AT&T and Jeff Smith, CTO at Numerex. Both are movers and shakers in the space and it was such a pleasure meeting with many WTF members and interacting with the top-notch panelists. The event was recorded and is available on WTF’s Youtube Channel.

    We hosted the Atlanta Mobile Breakfast Series Event in Atlanta at the Commerce Club of Atlanta which has beautiful views of the Atlanta area.

    There is an old Chinese saying, “When the wind of change blows, some build walls others build windmills.” Our industry is going through tremendous change; it won’t be an exaggeration if I say that the tectonic plates are moving and moving fast. The motion is being forced both by the economic conditions but also the technology and business progress. I have been around the industry long enough but it still amazes me – the stuff that’s in the pipeline and how quickly consumers absorb it.

    The topic of our discussion was Connected Devices, the Cloud, and the Consumer. With connected devices, I am referring to the broad availability of devices that are connected to data networks – so they include smartphones, tablets, connected auto but also wellness devices like fitbit, energy meters, dog collars, medical devices, etc. as of last year, the subscription penetration was at 6B, next year, we will have more connections than people on this planet. In another 5-7 years, we might touch 20 Billion sensors on the planet. So you can see the growth is going to be astronomical.

    Another phenomenon is that of cloud. If a startup mentions Cloud in their presentation to a VC, the valuation doubles, you say mobile, and it quadruples. I don’t know how many of you are a fan of Mark Weisier, the Xerox Parc researcher who pioneered what became “always on, always connected” tagline of pervasive computing. It was more than 20 years ago, we finally are seeing that with the help of broadband networks, amazing devices, and open business models, information is truly available at the fingertips.

    The third leg of our discussion was the consumer – their appetite for new and the latest is creating this tremendous opportunity that is shaping their behavior and expectations.

    We had an awesome panel to discuss things in detail. First I discussed the topic with David Christopher, Chief Marketing Officer at AT&T Mobility. As most of you might be aware, AT&T is leading not only the US but the globe in their efforts to bring connected solutions to the market. I work around the world with top operators, and I can tell you there is no exciting place in mobile right now than right here in the US of A. US is leading in innovation, technology, and business model. We had lost touch after 1G and US truly teaching rest of the world how to do 4G right. David has a terrific background – a product and operationally driven CMO at one of the world’s biggest mobile operator and it was a delight to have him on the panel.

    I have known both Biju Nair and Louis Gump for sometime – several decades of mobile expertise. Louis is with CNN, has been running their mobile efforts which are top-notch. He is a recognized leader in the mobile advertising space and given that CNN’s properties span across multiple screens, he has really great insights as to how consumers behave across n-screens.

    Biju is a hard core technologist, has been working at solutions that make Louis’ stuff work across networks and devices. Many of you might not know but Synchronoss where Biju is the Chief Strategy Officer and Products EVP, powers online activation at AT&T. If you bought the iPhone over the last few years at AT&T, there is a good chance your order was processed by Synchronoss.

    Highlights from the discussion below:

    The team at Chetan Sharma Consulting really enjoyed taking the Breakfast Series to Atlanta. My thanks to the terrific team at WTF for their support and to the Atlanta Mobile Community for making the event so successful. Finally, the event wouldn’t have been possible without the support of our series partner – Synchronoss.

    As you might be aware, our fall mobile executive summit – Mobile Future Forward is going to be on Sept 10th. Registration is open. We are likely to sell out so grab your tickets early.

    Next Stop – London for our first venture across the pond. On June 29th, we host the discussion on Operator/OTT – The way forward with Telefonica, Orange, Rebtel, and Horizons Ventures. Read Frank Meehan’s pre-event interview about the topic here.

    Operators and OTT – The Way Forward – London

    Operator traditional revenue streams are under threat esp. voice and messaging. Access margins will continue to stay under pressure. OTT players are coming in fast and furious and it is not just the big ones like Google but also players like Whatsapp, Voxer, Viber and others. How do operators play in the new landscape – lessen the decline of their traditional revenues while investing in new areas that improve their overall margins and revenues. Do they play the role of an enabler, a utility player, or become the OTT player themselves? In a software-driven world, how do they stay nimble? On the flip side, what are some things that operators can provide to the OTT players that make them successful, take them to the market quickly and maintain a long-term healthy and mutually-beneficial partnership? Operators still generate 70% of the global mobile industry revenues, so they are an important part of the chain but how do they ensure they have an equally relevant share in the profits. The panel will discuss how operators and OTT players think about the challenges and the opportunities, the competition and the coopetition.

    MBS London – Frank Meehan Interview June 9, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : Mobile Breakfast Series,OTT,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , 1 comment so far

    Mobile Breakfast Series Frank Meehan, Horizons Ventures VC: Why Operators Should Follow Telefónica & AT&T Innovation Blueprint

    With MBS Seattle behind us, we are gearing up for Atlanta and London. Our good partner Mobile Groove did a nice interview with one of our speakers and my good friend – Frank Meehan who will be with us in London on the Operators/OTT panel. Frank has done terrific stints at Ericsson, 3 UK, INQMobile and now is with Horizons Venture –

    Some highlights:

    What must mobile operators do?

    Yes, OTT players have had a hearty meal at the expense of the mobile operator, but there is still money to be made if mobile operators concentrate on what they do best.

    As Frank puts it: “Going out and trying to build a social network is probably not the right thing to do, but there are some great things that operators are doing.  I particularly like the way Telefónica Digital has set up really a separate company which is designed to go after digital opportunities.  That’s the right way to do it.”

    Facing the talent crisis

    Operators should stake their turf (connected home, security, the Cloud, etc) and build their business. But, Frank warns, the biggest challenge for operators is talent. “A lot of the young and upcoming talent is going off to work for startups.”

    What can operators do to stem the flow of talent to startups (that may one day be their rivals)? A lot! Follow the Telefónica Digital blueprint and give your talent freedom to innovate. “You’ve got to have incentives that compete with startups, or with the Facebooks and Googles otherwise it will become very difficult.”

    When it comes to software solutions or the way they are developed, mobile operators should see these are the work of a “separate team outside of the operator standard operations.”

    What awaits operators?

    As a VC, Frank is convinced there is money to be made. “Operators are cash rich and it’s still a good business and they will snap up things, so certainly there’s an opportunity for investments to crystallize, particularly from a sale — then operators are very interesting.”

    Overall, Frank says 2012 has been a great year from “an investment and a start-up perspective.” In his view, it’s “booming” — in part thanks to the Facebook IPO and the excitement it has generated around other companies that tap into our mobile Zeitgeist and requirement for social, sharing and connectedness. “Facebook is literally now the electricity of the Internet … and it’s a huge shift — you’re seeing the big companies like Spotify and others — and it’s just really dragging a huge start-up industry along with it, and it’s accelerating.”

    You can listen to the whole interview here.

    Mobile Breakfast Series Recap – Operators/OTT – The Way Forward June 8, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : AORTA,Applications,Carnival of Mobilists,Connected Devices,Mobile Advertising,Mobile Applications,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Ecosystem,Mobile Future Forward,OTT,Unified Messaging,US Wireless Market,VoIP,Worldwide Wireless Market , 4 comments

    June is the Mobile Breakfast Series Month with 3 programs planned in 3 cities across 2 continents. We kicked things off with the first one earlier today in Seattle. The topic of discussion was Operators and OTT – The Way Forward.

    We also announced our fall program of Mobile Future Forward. More about that later.

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    There is an old Chinese saying, “When the wind of change blows, some build walls others build windmills” Our industry is going through tremendous change; it won’t be an exaggeration if I say that the tectonic plates are moving, in some places quite violently. The motion is being forced both by the economic conditions but also by the technology and business progress. I have been around the industry long enough but it still amazes me – the stuff that’s in the pipeline and how quickly consumers absorb it.

    The topic of our discussion was Operators and OTT or Over the Top. These are services like Skype, Youtube, Amazon video, HBO, etc. things that go over the network. I wanted to broaden the discussion to another acronym – VAS or value added services – both for the consumer segment and the enterprise segment. These will be simple things like address backup or CRM applications to more sophisticated supply chain management, in-store location targeting, advertising etc. To discuss this we have an absolutely brilliant panel representing various parts of the value chain.

    RealNetworks has been the Kevin Bacon of startups in Seattle. Thanks to the people Rob Glaser hired, RN has done a better job at spawning up new ideas that your bigger cousins in town. Rob is well known for his pioneering work in giving Internet its voice (in the words of Kara Swisher in the 1998 article for WSJ). But lately, Rob has been busy with Sidecar – a next generation communication app that does more things than messaging and voice. If you haven’t tried, please do so.

    Mary Jesse is one of the most distinguished engineers in WA State going back from the McCaw days, VP of Eng at AT&T, CTO of RadioFrame and now CoFounder and CEO of an enterprise communications company called Ivytalk. Again, if you haven’t tried it out, please do so.

    Michael Shim was with Yahoo before Groupon and Yahoo was one of the true pioneers in the mobile space and now at Groupon he is seeing the new opportunities on the VAS, payments, and commerce. It will be great to get his view of how Groupon thinks about the space.

    Have you tried T-Mobile’s Bobsled? Well, Alex Samano is the man and energy behind this service and T-Mobile is one of the few operators globally who are taking this OTT opportunity head-on. At TMO, he has been involved some really interesting initiatives like @home and wifi calling.

    Last but not the least, Abhi Ingle from AT&T who heads up the mobile enterprise business. The industry has been talking about enterprise mobility for ages but his team generates more revenue than majority of the industry players combined. Did you know that AT&T is one of the biggest app developer on the planet? I bet you didn’t know that.

    Operator traditional revenue streams are under threat esp. voice and messaging. Access margins will continue to stay under pressure. OTT players are coming in fast and furious and it is not just the big ones like Google but also players like Whatsapp, Voxer, Viber and others. How do operators play in the new landscape – lessen the decline of their traditional revenues while investing in new areas that improve their overall margins and revenues. Do they play the role of an enabler, a utility player, or become the OTT player themselves? In a software-driven world, how do they stay nimble? On the flip side, what are some things that operators can provide to the OTT players that make them successful, take them to the market quickly and maintain a long-term healthy and mutually-beneficial partnership? Operators still generate 70% of the global mobile industry revenues, so they are an important part of the chain but how do they ensure they have an equally relevant share in the profits. The panel discussed how operators and OTT players think about the challenges and the opportunities, the competition and the coopetition.

    Some highlights from the discussion:

    Our next breakfast event is in Atlanta on Connected Devices on June 22nd. Then we revisit the Operator/OTT discussion again from the European point of view in London on June 29th. Tell your colleagues and friends about it. They will thank you for that.

    New Research: US Mobile Data Market Update Q1 2012 May 21, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : 3G,4G,AORTA,Connected Devices,Infrastructure,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Cloud Computing,Mobile Commerce,Mobile Ecosystem,Mobile Future Forward,US Wireless Market,Wireless Value Chain,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

    US Mobile Data Market Update Q1 2012

    http://www.chetansharma.com/USmarketupdateQ12012.htm

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    Summary

    The US mobile data market grew 6% Q/Q and 21% Y/Y to reach $18.7B in Q1 2012. Data is now over 40% of the US mobile industry service revenue. For the year 2012, we are forecasting that mobile data revenues in the US market will reach $80 billion.

    For the first time in the history of the industry, the US operators had a net decline in postpaid subs. The top 7 operators lost a combined 52K postpaid subs. In overall net-adds, Sprint bested both of its bigger rivals for the first time since Q1 2002. That was exactly a decade ago when Cingular and Nextel brands were still around, before Google IPO and before Zuckerberg enrolled into Harvard. In fact, Sprint is the only US operator that has added more than 1 million subs every quarter since Q4 2010. However, most of these net-adds are coming from prepaid and wholesale segments. If we look at the net-adds over the last 4 quarters, AT&T comes out on top by a distance. In terms of postpaid net-adds only, Verizon is the clear leader during the same time period.

    In terms of Y/Y growth, Connected Devices segment grew 23%, Prepaid 15%, Wholesale 10%, and Postpaid 1%. AT&T, Sprint, Sprint, and Verizon are number one respectively in these categories.

    One-third of US consumers don’t use landline phones. The wireless only US population went past 100M subs in Q1 2012. Mobile will continue to increase its share of the household IT budget and thus improving the overall revenue picture. However, there will be fierce battle for the prized postpaid subs that have been slowly migrating to prepaid as a result of the economic doldrums. It is quite possible, they will come back but predicting the reverse migration is tough.

    Q1 2012 will also be remembered for Samsung’s ascend to the top of the hill ending Nokia’s 14 year run. In terms of unit sales, it dominates the overall unit shipments and also the more lucrative smartphone segment. However, Apple dominates both the device revenues and more importantly just crushes the competition on device profits. It has only 8% of the global unit shipment share but over 70% profit share.

    Apple has the complete stronghold on the supply chain and has sucked out the oxygen from the OEM world. Samsung for its part has done a credible job at keeping pace and in being competitive. As expected, the Chinese OEMs – ZTE and Huawei (and some new ones that you will hear about in the next few quarters) are coming on strong from the bottom. This means, the players caught in the middle face perilous times.

    AT&T edged past NTT DoCoMo to become number two in global mobile data revenues rankings for the first time. Now top positions in the global rankings are occupied by the US operators.

    Smartphone sales continued at a brisk pace accounting for almost 70% of the devices sold in Q1 2012.

    Operator and OTT – The way forward

    We are at a critical juncture of the industry evolution. The OTT phenomenon is shifting the tectonic plates at a rapid pace. What seemed like a minor irritant only a few quarters back is become a nuisance virus that is eating away the core. Some operators have gone into panic mode while others have stepped back, assessed the situation, embraced it, and will try to exploit the opportunity. The truth of the matter is that the two biggest apps – voice and messaging didn’t really evolve a period of two decades. When the last big invention was interoperability and that too a decade ago, you know things are ripe for disruption. Thanks to the availability of always-on IP networks, new and nimble players are pushing the boundaries of what’s possible. It is not that some of these concepts haven’t been around for a while. RCS has been around for the last 5 years and this year there has been some tangible progress. However, while the world waits for interop and wide availability, startups can offer similar and in most cases, better services now. They can iterate rapidly and reach scale at much faster pace. We are in software-defined world after all. Smarter operators are launching their own OTT services while nodding at the standards implementations.

    It is such a critical topic for the industry that we are devoting two Mobile Breakfast Series events to this topic. The first in Seattle on June 7th with AT&T, T-Mobile, Groupon, Ivycorp, and Sidecar and the second in London on June 29th with Telefonica, Orange, Rebtel, and Horizons Ventures. We will also be delving deep into the subject at our annual mobile brainstorming summit – Mobile Future Forward on Sept 10th in Seattle.

    Mobile First to Mobile Only

    Couple of years, the realization in the industry set in that mobile is going to really dominate the world. Senior executives like Eric Schmidt at Google started to preach the gospel. Very quickly, we are at another pivot point wherein the mobile first doctrine is going to move to mobile only. It is not that the desktop world will disappear into oblivion. Far from it. But, the investments, strategy, and execution will be driven by mobile. As we said in our global research update last month, in 3-5 years, with few exceptions, if a company is not doing majority of its digital business on mobile, it is going to be irrelevant. There are already several data points to support the theory. Leading apps and services like Facebook, Twitter, Pandora are already operating in the world where mobile is driving majority of their user engagement. Expedia, Fandango and others are seeing the early signs of migration into the mobile dominated world.

    Postpaid Doldrums

    For the first time in the history of the industry, the US operators had a net decline in postpaid subs. This is because of the shift to prepaid in recent times as well as the increased competition for the last few potential postpaid subs. So, the question emerges, where will the net-sub and net-revenue growth going to come from in the next few years. The smartphone penetration in the US was at 43% as of Q1 2012 so the significant opportunities are in the upgrades and non-data to data conversion. Family data plans (see below) will help in bolstering data revenues as well. Multiple devices/consumer will increase the sub penetration which is at 110%.

    Family data plans

    We have been big advocates of family data plans for the last 2 years and they are finally coming to the US market in the next few months if not weeks. Like gravity, it’s inevitable. Consumers want simplicity and common sense. Family data plans doesn’t necessarily mean that all family members will be forced onto a single data plan but rather the consumers given the opportunity to combine data usage under the same umbrella if they wanted to. If all in the family are heavy data users, initially, some of the data tiers might not make sense but for the vast majority, there are always going to be devices or family members who don’t need a separate full-fledged data usage plan.

    When I talked to CNBC earlier this year (Jan), I said that there is a 90%+ probability that the family data plans will be introduced in the US market in 2012. I discussed this more with Bloomberg andUSA Today last week. Verizon and AT&T have been preparing the media and the consumers for this eventuality. Once one operator opens the door, expect rest to follow. Our Atlanta Mobile Breakfast Series will touch upon this topic during the discussion on Connected Devices, the Cloud, and the Consumer (with AT&T, Synchronoss, and CNN).

    Mobile Data Growth – The Gigabyte Generation

    The smartphone data consumption at some operators in the US is averaging close to 800 MB/mo. As we move into the 1GB range along with the family data plans getting introduced shortly, you can expect the data tiers to get bigger both in GBs and $. Mobile data traffic growth continued unabated doubling again for the 8th straight year. We expect the mobile consumption to double again in 2012. Data now constitutes over 85% of the mobile traffic in the US. As new devices and new network technology roll-outs continued in 2012, the data traffic will grow at the expected pace. The signaling traffic is growing at even a faster pace, 3 times in some cases. Stay tuned for our research paper in the Yottabyte paper series on the topic later this year.

    Platform wars

    Now that Google’s Motorola deal is approved in China and Facebook’s stellar IPO is behind us, we are going to witness a contentious platform battle between the fab five. Google is preparing to get deeper into handset business while Amazon and Facebook are tinkering with their own handsets. Microsoft is banking on the Lumia success and the release of Windows 8 and its impact on the ecosystem will be closely monitored. Samsung is putting some resources behind Tizen to hedge its bets in case things go south with its current partnerships. The platform narrative is still being defined by Apple which has the commanding mindshare of the developers, operators, and the profits. Follow the money and the puzzle unravels in front of your eyes.

    Mobile Patents Landscape

    2011 was the most active year for mobile patents in terms of disputes. All the major players were active in filing and protecting their turf for the future battles. IBM topped the industry in the most number of mobile patents granted in 2011 in the US followed by Samsung and Microsoft. The rest of the top 10 in order included Sony, Qualcomm, LG, Ericsson, Panasonic, Broadcom and RIM. Of the major players, Nokia occupied #12, Intel #13, Apple #16, Motorola #21, and Google #23 spot in the top 50 ranking. Amongst the mobile operators, Sprint was the leader with 323 patents granted in 2011. We have more research coming out later in the year that shows the relative patent strength of the various mobile players.

    Market Consolidation

    The AT&T-T-Mobile merger might not have gone through but that doesn’t stop industry to play the M&A speculation parlor game. Except for a few impossible scenarios, all sorts of deals are being contemplated. The market economics is clearly crying out for more consolidations. However, in an election year, there is an uneasy uncertainty that is gripping the market. The smaller M&As won’t move the needle and bigger M&A are not going to be on the table until we get into a new calendar year.

    Connected Universe, Monetizing Opportunities

    While 2011 was the year of figuring what the opportunities are in the new connected era, 2012 is starting to focus on how to monetize those opportunities. That will be the theme of our Mobile Future Forward Thought-leadership summit in Sept. More details to come. Almost all the vertical industries are benefiting from the connected devices and ubiquity of broadband networks – security, health, retail, utility, transportation, entertainment, and others. We will take a deep dive into the issues, the best case studies, the opportunities, and the players. We are assembling industries who’s who to help you figure out where the industry is headed next.

    What to expect in the coming months?

    All this has setup an absolutely fascinating 2012 in the communication/computing industry. Convergence is everywhere and is leading to a fundamental reset of the value chains and ecosystems.

    As usual, we will be keeping a very close eye on the micro- and macro-trends and reporting on the market on a regular basis in various private and public settings.

    Against this backdrop, the analysis of the Q1 2012 US wireless data market is:

    Service Revenues

    ARPU

    Subscribers

    Applications and Services

    Handsets

    Mobile Data Growth

    Global Update

    Your feedback is always welcome.

    Chetan Sharma

    We will be keeping a close eye on the trends in the wireless data sector in our blog, twitter feeds, future research reports, and articles. The next US Wireless Data Market update will be released in Aug 2012. The next Global Wireless Data Market update will be issued in Nov 2012.

    Disclaimer: Some of the companies mentioned in this paper are our clients.

    CTIA Wireless 2012 Recap May 14, 2012

    Posted by chetan in : 3G,4G,AORTA,Carriers,CTIA,European Wireless Market,Infrastructure Providers,Mobile Breakfast Series,Mobile Future Forward,Mobile Operators,Worldwide Wireless Market , add a comment

    CTIA Wireless 2012 Recap

    http://www.chetansharma.com/ctiawireless2012.htm

    CTIA returned to New Orleans after many years and it was great to see the city revitalized and ready to host the wireless show. Overall there were no big announcements, no blockbuster deals, no zingers from speakers that made the headlines. However, it was good to take the pulse of the industry. We met with several prominent industry executives, long-time colleagues, and new entrepreneurs. This note presents the summary of my observations from the show.

    Mobile Web and Apps – I had the opportunity to chair the Mobile Web and Apps event and kick off the proceedings with an opening keynote on the State of the Mobile Industry. It was based on our recent global market update that we released last week. In fact, many CEOs and speakers including FCC Chairman Genachowski frequently referenced from the research throughout the show. Wireless Week did a nice cover story based on the talk. There was good discussion and debate about what’s working and what’s not, how developers try to create demand and monetize eyeballs, the issues of security and privacy. Mastercard announced its payment developer APIs program. In fact, the show had the presence of all the major credit card companies. Payments, wallet, and commerce were the big talking point.

    Operators vs. OTT – The theme of Mobile World Congress continued at CTIA with the topic dominating in both open forums as well as behind closed doors. While most of the ink has been focused on how OTT players are killing operator revenue streams, there is the untold story of operator collaboration with the OTTs. I wrote a piece on the topic for Synergy magazine “Mobile Operators and OTTs: Building a win-win.” The manner in which operators respond to the OTT opportunity/threat will end up defining their future in the years to come. Some operators like TeliaSonera have reacted by throwing their hands and just charging extra for OTT services while others like Telefonica are launching innovative services. We have looked at this topic in-depth for many years and have some more new research coming out in the next few weeks. Stay tuned.

    The challenge for some of the operators is in stark display. While T-Mobile’s Bobsled app garnered (95% users non-TMO customers) 1 million users, Viber announced the 70 million milestone. To be a relevant app, one needs scale. Operators have the advantage of providing better call quality. The call quality on many mobile VoIP services is subpar and enterprise customers (and consumers) will pay a premium for better call quality.

    Digital Life and New Revenue Streams – In the US, AT&T dominates the connected devices spaces. Indeed in terms of rolling out new services, it is a step ahead of the competition. AT&T has been showing the Digital Life concepts at Mobile World Congress and at CTIA they announced the trial and actual product availability in 2013. This clearly bodes well for the industry for there are many adjacent industries where operators can play an important role. Other operators should pay close attention. We will be discussing the Connected Devices opportunities in detail at our Atlanta Mobile Breakfast Series Event on June 22nd with AT&T, Synchronoss, and CNN.

    Traffic Growth and Signaling storm – As we have mentioned in our various research papers and research updates, mobile traffic is roughly doubling YOY in most major markets including the US. While data traffic hogs the headlines, signaling is becoming a menace to network management esp. Android which tends to be more inefficient in handling network resources. We will have a more in-depth discussion of these topics in our upcoming Yottabyte research paper.

    TMO Acquisition – Last year, AT&T’s proposed acquisition of T-Mobile rocked the industry and kept the regulators busy for better part of 2011. While there were no blockbuster announcements, T-Mobile’s acquisition of MetroPCS along with Nokia and RIM’s long-term prospects remained popular water cooler topics.

    Nokia’s revival – Nokia has a lot to prove. Its future is riding on the success of the Lumia series of devices in 2012.  Though it hasn’t exactly set things on fire, the sales are actually doing fine. It is amongst the top selling devices at AT&T and is showing stickiness. However, Nokia is getting crushed in other markets, so the net impact on overall cash position can be significant if it is not able to arrest the downfall in the next 3-4 quarters.

    Small Cells – A couple of years ago, small cells and HetNets were just talking point. Now, operators are weaving them into their execution plans as they lay out their 4G networks. Given that mobile data growth is going to stay front and center for the foreseeable future, expect to hear about small cells and HetNets for some time to come.

    TMO $4B network deal – Generally, the network deals of this size takes many quarters to iron out. T-Mobile moved fairly quickly to iron out its LTE rollout plans and its vendors.  Not surprisingly, the spoils of the deal went to Ericsson and NSN. In light of the collapse of LightSquared, this deal might provide NSN a lifeline to continue operations for a few more years.

    Mobile Wallets and Mobile Payments – While 2012 will not be the year of mobile payments; it certainly is the year of mobile wallets launches and lots of them. Every financial institution worthy of its salt has launched a wallet. We are just going through the early turbulence cycle of this new segment. However, the opening up of the payment APIs from the financial industry is leading to some compelling experiences and use cases.

    NFC was absent – The talk of NFC as a payment solution was noticeably muted. We have always said that NFC will have more impact from other solutions than payment.

    Verizon – LTE – Competing on LTE, the fight to build the fastest and biggest LTE network is on. Verizon has an early formidable lead but in 2013 rivals will start to catch-up.

    Messaging innovation – As I mentioned to the NY Times and discussed it in our annual global mobile update, messaging revenue has started to decline in some countries. Some operators in Europe are in a state of panic. Chaos creates new opportunities. While operators have just given up on fighting the OTT war, others are gearing with new apps and services of their own (TU Me from Telefonica, Bobsled from T-Mobile, On from Orange). Several startups are also helping the operators innovate on the messaging front. SMS was invented in the early nineties but operators didn’t really take messaging to the next level for the last two decades. I met with a number of companies which are doing some interesting work on the messaging side – like ZipWhip, Maxx Wireless, OpenMarket, and others. Some of these companies are still in the stealth mode and expect to make some waves in the coming months. We will be taking this topic head-on in our Mobile Breakfast Series in Seattle (w/ AT&T, Groupon) and London (w/ Telefonica, Orange, Horizons Venture, Rebtel)

    Sprint Guardian, and other apps – in line with generating more revenue form other apps, Sprint guardian was launched with Safely and the service is seeing pretty good traction in the early days and might be able to increase the lifetime value of the customer. Other US operators have similar services available on their network as well. Operators will have to invest heavily in VAS ecosystem and services to arrest the declining revenue in other segments.

    FCC, Spectrum and Regulations – FCC continued to make its case for more spectrum via incentive auction. With a change of guard expected next year, it will be interesting to see how some of these efforts pan out. FCC should create parallel incentive programs like a $1B prize for tangibly solving the spectrum crisis w/o the need of new spectrum.

    Absence of large players – The lack of any major announcements was only rivaled by the absence of the former CTIA heavyweights like Samsung, Alcatel-Lucent, Nokia, Motorola, and Microsoft. Others had fairly low-key presence.

    Regulations – Regulations lag the technology industry progress and it is getting to the point that they might end up hindering growth esp. related to communication, privacy and monetization of network assets. It is time to consider bringing all communication, and data privacy rules under the same umbrella so both the telecom and Internet players are guided by the same set of principles.

    Your feedback is always welcome.

    Chetan Sharma

    We will be keeping a close eye on the trends in the wireless data sector in our blog, twitter feeds, future research reports, and articles. The next US Wireless Data Market update will be released in May 2012. The next Global Wireless Data Market update will be issued in Nov 2012.

    Disclaimer: Some of the companies mentioned in this paper are our clients.